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February is time for #wildread for the twitter reading group #rwpchat

February 1, 2018

The #wildread theme brings to mind lots of great books about being wild, such the children’s classics ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ by Maurice Sendak and ‘Call of the Wild’ by Jack London, which could lead to some great themed photographs in the library. Here are some free printable finger puppets of Max and his crew that borrowers old or young could be asked ‘model’ as a way of introducing them to the #RWP game. We would like to engage the public as much as possible in our RWP game this year, therefore any suggestions towards this would be very welcomed!

Other #wildread related books that could be incorporated into a post or a book display are the popular books about having an adventure in the wilderness. Two fairly recent books that were made into movies are ‘Wild : From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail” by Cheryl Strayed and “Into the Wild” by Jon Krakauer. Ideas that revolve around this trope could include non-fiction survival guides, camping books, and travel adventure stories. As many people go away camping at this time of year, this would be a good time to naturally link to this part of the collection as a display topic.

#wildreads is also something that lends itself very naturally to sci-fi and fantasy fiction, and there are so many books with fantastic worlds that can be highlighted with this theme. These include the popular junior, youth and adult genres of books about shapeshifters, vampires and other creatures that go bump in the night, as well as fairy tale books, which are enjoying a resurgence. And Doctor Who, of course, who really does play by his own rules as he jaunts about saving the universe.

Horror can be a great way to explore #wildread , but so can romance, and there is a lot to explore.

Lonesome Dove, the book and the miniseries will take you to the wild west, and you could shake things up by adding some sci-fi to your western with Firefly and Serenity.

Perhaps the most famous Wilde of all time is, of course, Oscar Wilde, and the #wildread month could lend itself to sharing some of his more memorable quotes, which range from the profound:

“The spirit of an age may be best expressed in the abstract ideal arts, for the spirit itself is abstract and ideal..”

to the absurd:

“Arguments are to be avoided: they are always vulgar and often convincing.”

It could be that the January #rwpchat might revolve around a series of your favourite quotes by this master wordsmith.

Getting wild with your watching could mean an awful lot of David Attenborough or Bear Grylls, exploring uncharted territories, bush tucker and world heritage areas, but it could just mean stepping out of your comfort zone and watching something different.

 

Surely, a game of Jumanji is a must this month…..

There will be a twitter discussion on 27 February starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time, 9am – 11am BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #wildread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #wildread, so others can join in the conversation too.

 

 

join the #firstread discussion today for #rwpchat

January 30, 2018

There will be a twitter discussion today. 30 January starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time. 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST (UK). Note this is a staggered discussion.

Please use the tags #firstread and #rwpchat as you discuss your reading, watching, and playing that is your experience of #firstread, so that others can join in the conversation too.

rwp first time image

(c) House Buy Fast/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

There is nothing like the experience of falling in love with a book; it can’t be repeated. You can read the book over and over, loving it more each time, but you can only read it for the first time once. Thankfully, there is no end to books, films and games to discover for the first time, and many other ways to start off the Read Watch Play year with #firstread.

What was the first book you remember loving? The first book you read in a beloved genre? The games we first played always have a special place in our hearts, and the music that was popular in our teenage years cannot be beaten.

Our own lives are full of firsts we can celebrate, and so are those of others. Explore scientific firsts, space travel firsts, exploration and adventure firsts. The first time someone murdered, fell in love or got a job.

Have you read the first book your favourite author has written, heard the first album released by a favourite artist, played the first video game in a favourite series? How do the firsts compare with the most recent?

Though not the first novel written by Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre was the first published, so we can definitely start our year off with the best. Her sister Emily’s first and only novel, Wuthering Heights is a piece of classic storytelling that in part inspired the upcoming Gothic Novel Jam, running in July.

Debut novels can be hard to follow up, but you could read your way through this list of second novels, or just pick the first from a huge number of top tens.

Whatever you choose to read, watch or play this month, it’s all going to be your first for this year so definitely fits the #firstread theme.

 

Start the new year with #firstread for #rwpchat – what is your #firstread for the year?

January 1, 2018

#firstread

rwp first time image

(c) House Buy Fast/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

There is nothing like the experience of falling in love with a book; it can’t be repeated. You can read the book over and over, loving it more each time, but you can only read it for the first time once. Thankfully, there is no end to books, films and games to discover for the first time, and many other ways to start off the Read Watch Play year with #firstread.

What was the first book you remember loving? The first book you read in a beloved genre? The games we first played always have a special place in our hearts, and the music that was popular in our teenage years cannot be beaten.

Our own lives are full of firsts we can celebrate, and so are those of others. Explore scientific firsts, space travel firsts, exploration and adventure firsts. The first time someone murdered, fell in love or got a job.

Have you read the first book your favourite author has written, heard the first album released by a favourite artist, played the first video game in a favourite series? How do the firsts compare with the most recent?

Though not the first novel written by Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre was the first published, so we can definitely start our year off with the best. Her sister Emily’s first and only novel, Wuthering Heights is a piece of classic storytelling that in part inspired the upcoming Gothic Novel Jam, running in July.

Debut novels can be hard to follow up, but you could read your way through this list of second novels, or just pick the first from a huge number of top tens.

Whatever you choose to read, watch or play this month, it’s all going to be your first for this year so definitely fits the #firstread theme.

There will be a twitter discussion on January 30 starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time. 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST (UK). Note this is a staggered discussion.

Please use the tags #firstread and #rwpchat as you discuss your reading, watching, and playing that is your experience of #firstread, so that others can join in the conversation too.

join the #timetravelread discussion today for #rwpchat

December 19, 2017
Hot Wheels 1015 - Hover mode DeLorean (Back to the Future)

Hot Wheels 2015 – Hover mode DeLorean (Back to the Future), by RiveraNotario (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

This month the theme is #timetravelread.

What will be your favourite #timetravelread this month? While you are reading, watching or playing your #timetravelread, you might like to tweet about it using the tags #timetravelread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you.

There will be a Twitter discussion today 19 December starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 8am – 10.30am GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Who hasn’t wondered what it would be like to travel back in time to a particular event in history, or forwards in time to experience the future and how you would time travel to get there? By placing your hands on a stone in an ancient stone circle as inOutlander by Diana Gabaldon or through a time loop as in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs. Perhaps you wouldn’t have control over when you time travelled like Henry De Tamble in Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, who suffers from a rare genetic disorder that makes him drift uncontrollably backwards and forwards through time. Or would you use a vehicle that would allow you to choose when in time you wanted to travel to as in The Time Machine by H G Wells.

Maybe you would like to build your own time machine. How to Build a Time Machine by Paul Davies will get you started. Having A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking will be very useful. Then you will need to know how to time travel, read Louis A. Del Monte’s How to Time Travel: Explore the Science, Paradoxes, and Evidence. What happens if you encounter a black hole or time warp while time travelling? Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein’s Outrageous Legacy by Kip S. Thorne will inform you.

Many children’s books feature time travel: Time Riders by Alex Scarrow whose characters travel in time to protect us from people plotting to destroy the world and Day of Vengeance by Johnny O’Brien in which schoolboy time-traveller Jack Christie is thrown back to 1940s Nazi-occupied France. OrArtemis Fowl and the Time Paradox by Eoin Colfer in which Artemis has to travel back in time to battle his younger, more evil self.

How about playing some music featuring time travel while reading your #timetravelread? Somewhere In Time – Iron Maiden, Robert Plant singing “I am a traveller of both time and space” in Kashmir, Uriah Heep’s – Travellers in Time, Hawkwind’s Silver Machine – “It flies sideways through time” or Strange Machines – The Gathering.

Playing time travel video games is a popular past time. Chrono Trigger in which you follow a group of adventurers who travel through time to prevent a global catastrophe, Time Splitters which has aliens using time travel to take over the earth or Singularity in which the main character acquires a time manipulation device and then travels between 1955 and 2010 to save the timeline.

Then there are films involving time travel. In Back to the Future part 2 the DeLorean is set to the future date of 21 October 2015 for Doc, Marty, and Jennifer to travel to. Bill & Ted use a phone box as a time machine in Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure to travel to various times in the past and return with important historical people to help them complete their history homework. It would certainly be an unusual and interesting way to learn about history.

Our favourite time lord can be seen in the cult television series Doctor Who, who explores the universe in his TARDIS, a time-travelling space ship. Maybe you preferred to watch the interstellar adventures of Captain Kirk and the crew of the starship Enterprise in Star Trek: The Original Series. Or perhaps you were a fan of Dr Sam Beckett from Quantum Leap, a physicist who leaps through space time during an experiment in time travel.

 

Join us for #timetravelread this month #rwpchat

December 1, 2017
Hot Wheels 1015 - Hover mode DeLorean (Back to the Future)

Hot Wheels 2015 – Hover mode DeLorean (Back to the Future), by RiveraNotario (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

This month the theme is #timetravelread.  Who hasn’t wondered what it would be like to travel back in time to a particular event in history, or forwards in time to experience the future and how you would time travel to get there?  By placing your hands on a stone in an ancient stone circle as inOutlander by Diana Gabaldon or through a time loop as in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs.  Perhaps you wouldn’t have control over when you time travelled like Henry De Tamble in Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger, who suffers from a rare genetic disorder that makes him drift uncontrollably backwards and forwards through time.  Or would you use a vehicle that would allow you to choose when in time you wanted to travel to as in The Time Machine by H G Wells.

Maybe you would like to build your own time machine.  How to Build a Time Machine by Paul Davies will get you started.  Having A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking will be very useful.  Then you will need to know how to time travel, read Louis A. Del Monte’s How to Time Travel: Explore the Science, Paradoxes, and Evidence.  What happens if you encounter a black hole or time warp while time travelling?  Black Holes and Time Warps: Einstein’s Outrageous Legacy by Kip S. Thorne will inform you.

Many children’s books feature time travel: Time Riders by Alex Scarrow whose characters travel in time to protect us from people plotting to destroy the world and Day of Vengeance by Johnny O’Brien in which schoolboy time-traveller Jack Christie is thrown back to 1940s Nazi-occupied France.  OrArtemis Fowl and the Time Paradox by Eoin Colfer in which Artemis has to travel back in time to battle his younger, more evil self.

How about playing some music featuring time travel while reading your #timetravelread?  Somewhere In Time – Iron Maiden, Robert Plant singing “I am a traveller of both time and space” in Kashmir, Uriah Heep’s – Travellers in Time, Hawkwind’s Silver Machine – “It flies sideways through time” or Strange Machines – The Gathering.

Playing time travel video games is a popular past time.  Chrono Trigger in which you follow a group of adventurers who travel through time to prevent a global catastrophe, Time Splitters which has aliens using time travel to take over the earth or Singularity in which the main character acquires a time manipulation device and then travels between 1955 and 2010 to save the timeline.

Then there are films involving time travel. In Back to the Future part 2 the DeLorean is set to the future date of 21 October 2015 for Doc, Marty, and Jennifer to travel to.  Bill & Ted use a phone box as a time machine in Bill & Ted’s Excellent Adventure to travel to various times in the past and return with important historical people to help them complete their history homework.  It would certainly be an unusual and interesting way to learn about history.

Our favourite time lord can be seen in the cult television series Doctor Who, who explores the universe in his TARDIS, a time-travelling space ship.  Maybe you preferred to watch the interstellar adventures of Captain Kirk and the crew of the starship Enterprise in Star Trek: The Original Series.  Or perhaps you were a fan of Dr Sam Beckett from Quantum Leap, a physicist who leaps through space time during an experiment in time travel.

What will be your favourite #timetravelread this month?  While you are reading, watching or playing your #timetravelread, you might like to tweet about it using the tags #timetravelread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you.

There will be a Twitter discussion on 19 December starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 8am – 10.30am GMT.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

join the #nordicread discussion today for #rwpchat

November 28, 2017
Hallgrímskirkja

Hallgrímskirkja, by Kris Rupp (CC BY-NC 2.0)

What will be your favourite #nordicread this month? While you are reading, watching or playing your #nordicread, you might like to tweet about it using the tags #nordicread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you.

There is a Twitter discussion today, 28 November starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 8am – 10.30am GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

This month the theme is #nordicread from the lands of ice and fire. The nights are drawing in and getting colder, perfect conditions to witness the spectacular phenomenon of the northern lights (Aurora Borealis) a curtain of coloured lights illuminating the sky.

Perhaps you would rather stay indoors reading Nordic noir to pass those long winter nights. Start with Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö’s Martin Beck novels that shaped the future of Nordic crime writing. Then curl up with the latest Mari Jungstedt, Camilla Läckberg or Arnaldur Indridason for a chilling read. Or read Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren or The Moomins by Tove Jansson to your children at bedtime.

Maybe you prefer to watch your Nordic noir on television. Tune into sub-titled series such as The Bridge; which is set in Sweden and Denmark, Swedish dramas Thicker than Water and Blue Eyes or Trapped set in a remote town in Iceland. These crime dramas make compelling viewing and present a slice of Nordic life.

Do you like to watch a Nordic noir film on the big screen having read the book first? The Girl with the dragon tattoo by Stieg Larsson with his unforgettable character Lisbeth Salander comes to mind.

Perhaps you listen to music while reading Nordic crime fiction. How about the ethereal music of Sigur Rós or the electronic sounds of Röyksopp? Or maybe you prefer rock bands such as Nightwish, Thunder Mother or Christina Skjolberg. Or maybe you enjoy listening to 1970s pop group Abba. If you’re a fan pay a visit to Abba: The Museum in Stockholm.

If all that reading and watching has left you feeling that you need to be active how about playing the Swedish game of kubb. Tag, toss & run : 40 classic lawn games by Paul Boardway Tukey will give you the rules of the game. It’s traditionally an outdoor game with wooden pieces that can also be adapted for children to play indoors during the cold winter months. The aim of the game is to knock down all the pieces including the king on your opponent’s side.

Then there is Nordic food: meatballs with lingonberry jam, sampled on a visit to IKEA. Try a smorgasbord which wouldn’t be complete without pickled herring or, maybe not to everyone’s taste: sheep’s head as eaten by a character in Arnaldur Indridason’s books. Or how about trying grillimakkara – grilled sausages eaten with mustard. Finnish children grow up eating these at their summer cottages and also in the winter while playing around a campfire.

To keep warm during the cold winter days wear a Faroe Island jumper as worn by actress Sofie Gråbøl’s character Sarah Lund in Danish TV series The Killing. Maybe you’d like to have a go at knitting your own jumper? Fair Isle & Nordic knits : 25 projects inspired by traditional colourwork designs by Nicki Trench will get you started.

Visit architecturally interesting buildings such as Hallgrímskirkja which is the largest church in Iceland or Finlandia Hall designed by Finnish architect Alvar Aalto. Or wander through the medieval streets of Gamla Stan in Stockholm.

Or perhaps you enjoy looking at works of art by Nordic artists. The most famous painting being The Scream by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch. Or maybe you prefer the paintings of Finnish artist Akseli Gallen-Kallela or the sculpture of Carl Milles.

Nordic art and culture will feature at The Southbank Centre in London in 2017 with events including visual art, dance, music, performance, fashion, food and design.

 

Join us for a #nordicread discussion this month #rwpchat

November 1, 2017
Hallgrímskirkja

Hallgrímskirkja, by Kris Rupp (CC BY-NC 2.0)

This month the theme is #nordicread from the lands of ice and fire.  The nights are drawing in and getting colder, perfect conditions to witness the spectacular phenomenon of the northern lights (Aurora Borealis) a curtain of coloured lights illuminating the sky.

Perhaps you would rather stay indoors reading Nordic noir to pass those long winter nights.  Start with Maj Sjöwall and Per Wahlöö’s Martin Beck novels that shaped the future of Nordic crime writing. Then curl up with the latestMari Jungstedt, Camilla Läckberg or Arnaldur Indridason for a chilling read.  Or read Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren or The Moomins by Tove Jansson to your children at bedtime.

Maybe you prefer to watch your Nordic noir on television.  Tune into sub-titled series such as The Bridge; which is set in Sweden and Denmark, Swedish dramas Thicker than Water and Blue Eyesor Trapped set in a remote town in Iceland.  These crime dramas make compelling viewing and present a slice of Nordic life.

Do you like to watch a Nordic noir film on the big screen having read the book first?  The Girl with the dragon tattoo by Stieg Larsson with his unforgettable character Lisbeth Salander comes to mind.

Perhaps you listen to music while reading Nordic crime fiction.  How about the ethereal music of Sigur Rós or the electronic sounds of Röyksopp?  Or maybe you prefer rock bands such as Nightwish, Thunder Mother or Christina Skjolberg.  Or maybe you enjoy listening to 1970s pop group Abba.  If you’re a fan pay a visit to Abba: The Museum in Stockholm.

If all that reading and watching has left you feeling that you need to be active how about playing the Swedish game of kubb.  Tag, toss & run : 40 classic lawn games by Paul Boardway Tukey will give you the rules of the game.  It’s traditionally an outdoor game with wooden pieces that can also be adapted for children to play indoors during the cold winter months.  The aim of the game is to knock down all the pieces including the king on your opponent’s side.

Then there is Nordic food: meatballs with lingonberry jam, sampled on a visit to IKEA.  Try a smorgasbord which wouldn’t be complete without pickled herring or, maybe not to everyone’s taste: sheep’s head as eaten by a character in Arnaldur Indridason’s books.  Or how about trying grillimakkara –  grilled sausages eaten with mustard.  Finnish children grow up eating these at their summer cottages and also in the winter while playing around a campfire.

To keep warm during the cold winter days wear a Faroe Island jumper as worn by actress Sofie Gråbøl’s character Sarah Lund in Danish TV series The Killing.  Maybe you’d like to have a go at knitting your own jumper?  Fair Isle & Nordic knits : 25 projects inspired by traditional colourwork designs by Nicki Trench will get you started.

Visit architecturally interesting buildings such as Hallgrímskirkja which is the largest church in Iceland or Finlandia Hall designed by Finnish architect Alvar Aalto.  Or wander through the medieval streets of Gamla Stan in Stockholm.

Or perhaps you enjoy looking at works of art by Nordic artists.  The most famous painting being The Scream by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch.  Or maybe you prefer the paintings of Finnish artist Akseli Gallen-Kallela or the sculpture of Carl Milles.

Nordic art and culture will feature at The Southbank Centre in London in 2017 with events including visual art, dance, music, performance, fashion, food and design.

What will be your favourite #nordicread this month?  While you are reading, watching or playing your #nordicread, you might like to tweet about it using  the tags #nordicread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you.

There will be a Twitter discussion on 28 November starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 8am – 10.30am GMT.  Note this is a staggered discussion.