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share your #secretread this month for #rwpchat

October 1, 2018

#secretread Can you keep a secret? You’ll need much longer than a month to read every book with that title, let alone any with a title containing the word ‘secret’. Secrets can be good, but they can also be nasty, so you can read romances where secrets bring the happiest of happy endings, or thrillers where secrets threaten to ruin lives.

There are many non-fiction books claiming to have ‘the secret’; the secret to love, health, happiness, business, cooking, wealth, tassles (!). How can there be any secrets left in the world?

You may wish to keep the books you read, the shows you watch or the games you play secret from anyone else. Guilty pleasure reads , or movies you are embarrassed to love. Or perhaps you want to keep a secret the books you are ashamed not to have read. Don’t give in to the shame! Read what you enjoy, skip what you don’t!

In the spirit of not keeping secrets, track and share your reading using Goodreads or Litsy. You can track and share the films you watch, too.

hidden door

Hidden door…..

Learn how to build a hidden door bookshelf to hide your favourite place to read, watch and play.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #secretread, you might like to tweet about it using #secretread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #secretread. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #secretread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

There will be a Twitter discussion on 30 October starting at 8pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 9am – 11am BST. Note : This is a staggered discussion.

Join the #reelread discussion today for #rwpchat

September 25, 2018

There will be a twitter discussion today 25 September starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time. 8am – 10.30am, GMT. Note: This is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #reelread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #reelread, so others can join in the conversation too.

 

plaza cinema 2

This month’s theme is #reelread

One of the great debates in reading is around the idea of ‘Literature’ vs ‘Fiction’. Another great debate is the idea of the need to ‘Read the book first ’ or ‘See the adaptation first’? Of course, there are no hard and fast rules. Some works take so long to make the transition from page to screen that readers just cannot wait. Some works are never reimagined from a text for film or television. In some cases, the film comes first, the book released as part of a suite of merchandising to market a movie.

If you have a choice – if both the book and the reel are available – what do you do? Do you always make the same decision?

What are some of your examples of ‘Love the book, didn’t like the film’ or ‘Love the film, didn’t like the book’? Is it okay to say that the Stephen King’s It is better as a book than a film? Is it okay to say that Peter Benchley’s Jaws is a better film than a book?

What does the screen bring to a story experience that a book cannot deliver? There is the soundtrack, the visual effects, the speed in which a film can be consumed. What do you think is most important?

Are some genres better on screen? Are there some books that should never be adapted?

Join in, for what could be one of the most controversial reading group discussions of 2018!

What are your favourite reel related reads? Any films or games? What are the blogs, twitter streams or magazines you read for, what have you watched (or watched again) for #reelread? Are there any apps which form part of your #reelread environment?

There will be a twitter discussion on 25 September starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time. 8am – 10.30am, GMT. Note: This is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #reelread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #reelread, so others can join in the conversation too.

You can add your pins to this board on Pinterest (once you follow it and we add you as a pinner) for #reelread too. Please use #rwpchat in the text of items which you pin.

Reeling: large and small screens for read, watch and play join the #reelread discussion for #rwpchat

September 1, 2018

Reeling: large and small screens for read, watch and play

#reelread

plaza cinema 2

This month’s theme is #reelread

One of the great debates in reading is around the idea of ‘Literature’ vs ‘Fiction’. Another great debate is the idea of the need to ‘Read the book first ’ or ‘See the adaptation first’? Of course, there are no hard and fast rules. Some works take so long to make the transition from page to screen that readers just cannot wait. Some works are never reimagined from a text for film or television. In some cases, the film comes first, the book released as part of a suite of merchandising to market a movie.

If you have a choice – if both the book and the reel are available – what do you do? Do you always make the same decision?

What are some of your examples of ‘Love the book, didn’t like the film’ or ‘Love the film, didn’t like the book’? Is it okay to say that the Stephen King’s It is better as a book than a film? Is it okay to say that Peter Benchley’s Jaws is a better film than a book?

What does the screen bring to a story experience that a book cannot deliver? There is the soundtrack, the visual effects, the speed in which a film can be consumed. What do you think is most important?

Are some genres better on screen? Are there some books that should never be adapted?

Join in, for what could be one of the most controversial reading group discussions of 2018!

What are your favourite reel related reads? Any films or games? What are the blogs, twitter streams or magazines you read for, what have you watched (or watched again) for #reelread? Are there any apps which form part of your #reelread environment?

There will be a twitter discussion on 25 September starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time. 8am – 10.30am, GMT. Note: This is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #reelread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #reelread, so others can join in the conversation too.

You can add your pins to this board on Pinterest (once you follow it and we add you as a pinner) for #reelread too. Please use #rwpchat in the text of items which you pin.

46 fantastic entries submitted Gothic Novel Jam #GothNovJam #classicread

August 29, 2018

DG8MRQeXcAQLTja (1)During July, in partnership with the British Library, we ran the Gothic Novel Jam, and we’ve only just finished trying out all the fantastic entries.

As a reminder, Gothic Novel Jam inspired participants to create something (anything!) based on the gothic novel genre. We also had a sub-theme of “The monster within”. By the start of it over 170 people had signed up to participate, and this resulted in 46 gothic themed entries submitted by people from all around the world including UK, Australia, America and France.

Most entries were digital games, and these spanned a range of genres themselves, including interactive fiction and text based games; 2D & 3D explorers, and arcade games.

As well as the digital games it was also great to see a short story, poem, random headstone generator, audio piece, Lair of the White Worm Kewpie doll, and a table top role playing storytelling game based on a Victorian seance submitted.

Guildford based game development company, Media Molecule, also got involved and created a stunning gothic game level in just over an hour with their newest game/game development engine Dreams. You can see the video of this here.

The Bitsy game development community also got involved with a monthly game jam that tied in with Gothic Novel Jam. Bitsy is a modern game making tool designed to create early 1980s style 2D games. This resulted in 10 original Bitsy games/stories being submitted to Gothic Novel Jam as well.

One of the ideas of the game jam was to encourage participants to use British Library images stored on Flickr as inspiration for their entries. In many cases the image, like the gothic novel genre, was a jumping off point for people and was used as inspiration. In other cases they were an integral part of the story. As a glow brings out a haze is a lovely example of how the illustrations could be used as a key part of the storytelling.

As you’d expect, there were some common themes (mansions, castles, hauntings, mystery, terror, horror), but it also spread out into LGBTQ++, southern and modern gothic, humour, and abstract forms.

It was interesting and exciting to see people’s projects take shape throughout July, as they shared their projects via the official discussion forum and other social media.

Thanks to everyone who submitted entries, or even attempted to participate but didn’t quite make it. We appreciate your getting involved. The entries were unique, interesting and fun to explore and experience, with lots of lovely art and engaging storytelling. We’re so pleased that this theme inspired so many people.

Thanks also to those who supported the jam by spreading the word and encouraging people to get involved, including Read Watch Play partners, the British Library, Media Molecule, the Bitsy community, and the International Gothic Association. The jam will also be saved as part of the UK Web Archive project.

Finally, all of the Gothic Novel Jam entries are available for anyone to play etc for free. We encourage you to try them out, and discover how the gothic novel has inspired so many people in so many different ways.

Gary Green (Surrey Libraries)

Join the #urbanread discussion today for #rwpchat

August 28, 2018

There will be a twitter discussion today 28 August starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time. 8am – 10.30am, GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #urbanread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of urbanread, so others can join in the conversation too.

August is the month for #urbanread – books, films and games set in any environment ranging from a densely populated city, towns (even small towns) to small villages. They may be set in any time period including the Victorian era or the distant future. The city itself may become a character, such as in books about urban places.

Consider reading author Ian Rankin or watch the My Place series by Nadia Wheatley to explore this. You may like to read urban fantasy, featuring magic and strange creatures, a great example is American Gods by Neil Gaiman, and make sure you include some Chuck Wendig too, with Dinocalypse now and Blue blazes, not to mention Cassandra Clare. Horror is brilliant for #urbanread as some of the most terrifying reading takes place in urban areas. Randa Abdel-Fattah, Will Kostakis and Benjamin Law have some great #urbanread suggestions.

This is the month to go local. Read something set in your local area-your place, where you recognise the landmarks, cafes, sights, maybe even the vibe of the town re-created in the setting of the books. Plan some urban travels to compliment your #urbanread. If you want some factual information about your environment, start your research in the local studies section of your local library. Incidentally, this is also a good place to find something to read by a local author. You may like to read further afield, for example, about slums, such as described in Slum Dog Millionaire. You might enjoy reading about buildings, urban planning or architecture.

Sustainability in our environment is another hot topic. In both fact and fiction there’s lots to read, watch and learn about. Choose something to read from the selection of Goodreads Sustainability book lists. Watch a movie, anything from Happy Feet or Wall- E to documentaries such as An inconvenient truth.

What about crime, including true crime? Crime stories can be set in any environment, usually urban. Read about underworld figures. Underbelly, Ripper Street, and Sherlock all present great watching for #urbanread.

While street art adorns the urban landscape, graffiti often poses the question – art or vandalism? You decide – try exploring the issue by reading some books celebrating the art of graffiti. You may enjoy some Graffiti in fiction.

Street literature is another upcoming genre to try.

Sometimes stories are based on an urban legend – why not scare yourself silly reading horror stories? Read something by these masters of horror – Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Edgar Allan Poe, Graham Masterton, H.P Lovecraft – they will leave you reading with the lights on. Many of these have also inspired film adaptations. Which is spookier, the book or the movie?

Think about urban wildlife too

While you are reading, playing or watching your #urbanread, you might like to tweet about it using #urbanread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #urbanread. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #urbanread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

 

August is a time to explore #urbanread for #rwpchat

August 1, 2018

#urbanread

August is the month for #urbanread – books, films and games set in any environment ranging from a densely populated city, towns (even small towns) to small villages. They may be set in any time period including the Victorian era or the distant future. The city itself may become a character, such as in books about urban places.

Consider reading author Ian Rankin or watch the My Place series by Nadia Wheatley to explore this. You may like to read urban fantasy, featuring magic and strange creatures, a great example is American Gods by Neil Gaiman, and make sure you include some Chuck Wendig too, with Dinocalypse now and Blue blazes, not to mention Cassandra Clare. Horror is brilliant for #urbanread as some of the most terrifying reading takes place in urban areas. Randa Abdel-Fattah, Will Kostakis and Benjamin Law have some great #urbanread suggestions.

This is the month to go local. Read something set in your local area-your place, where you recognise the landmarks, cafes, sights, maybe even the vibe of the town re-created in the setting of the books. Plan some urban travels to compliment your #urbanread. If you want some factual information about your environment, start your research in the local studies section of your local library. Incidentally, this is also a good place to find something to read by a local author. You may like to read further afield, for example, about slums, such as described in Slum Dog Millionaire. You might enjoy reading about buildings, urban planning or architecture.

Sustainability in our environment is another hot topic. In both fact and fiction there’s lots to read, watch and learn about. Choose something to read from the selection of Goodreads Sustainability book lists. Watch a movie, anything from Happy Feet or Wall- E to documentaries such as An inconvenient truth.

What about crime, including true crime? Crime stories can be set in any environment, usually urban. Read about underworld figures. Underbelly, Ripper Street, and Sherlock all present great watching for #urbanread.

While street art adorns the urban landscape, graffiti often poses the question – art or vandalism? You decide – try exploring the issue by reading some books celebrating the art of graffiti. You may enjoy some Graffiti in fiction.

Street literature is another upcoming genre to try.

Sometimes stories are based on an urban legend – why not scare yourself silly reading horror stories? Read something by these masters of horror – Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Edgar Allan Poe, Graham Masterton, H.P Lovecraft – they will leave you reading with the lights on. Many of these have also inspired film adaptations. Which is spookier, the book or the movie?

Think about urban wildlife too

While you are reading, playing or watching your #urbanread, you might like to tweet about it using #urbanread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #urbanread. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #urbanread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

There will be a twitter discussion on 28 August starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time. 8am – 10.30am, GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #urbanread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of urbanread, so others can join in the conversation too.

Join the #classicread discussion today for #rwpchat

July 31, 2018

There will be a twitter discussion today, 31 July starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time. 9.00pm New Zealand Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Join the discussion this month about #classicread. We will be focusing on all things classic in this discussion. Mark Twain defined a classic as a book which people praise but don’t read. There are plenty of books thought to be classics that we wish we had read, but don’t ever seem to actually get around to reading; books like Moby Dick, Ulysses and In Search of Lost Time often end up on that list. Classics have a bit of a reputation as dull, long or simply hard work, but this is a reputation that needs testing! Try this list.

wuthering heights

Cumbres borrascosas-2

Great British classics like Bleak House, Persuasion and North and South not only make the most delightful BBC miniseries, and don’t even get me started on the endless joy that is reading and watching Jane Eyre, but they are surprisingly wonderful reads as well. How many of today’s popular books will still be inspiring people in 200 years?

Not everyone enjoys the language of older classics, or can cope with the amount of description in classic novels (remember that without television or easy travel, how would you know what the world looked, smelt or tasted like?). Graphic novel versions can be a great way in for reluctant readers of classics and just another way to enjoy beloved tales for the rest of us. Then there are even more innovative versions such as The Lizzie Bennet Diaries , telling the familiar story of Pride and Prejudice using Tumblr, Twitter and You Tube.

You might like to try some classic non-fiction such as The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat or The Diary of Anne Frank, or children’s classics, such as Dr Seuss, May Gibbs and Beatrix Potter books and also those more recent books that have been read over and over such as Hairy Maclary and Possum Magic.

The classics can take you back much further than Mr Darcy’s time, too. Find the origin of many of our English sayings, and stories so familiar, in Shakespeare. Experience medieval times in the enduring Icelandic sagas or discover the strong influences in our modern culture and society found in the literature of ancient Greece.

There is plenty of classic television available on DVD, as well as classic films; how about some Hitchcock? Then there are classic games to play – Ludo, Monopoly, Space Invaders or the properly old-school, I Spy! And classic music albums. You may prefer to drool over some classic cars.

space invader

(c) Philosophia/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

A classic for me is not necessarily a classic for you, so we’ll have a great discussion about the nature of a classic. What makes a modern classic? Is the Harry Potter series a classic because it has been so widely read, or are there other criteria that are more important? What modern books would you call classics?

Two more classics we haven’t mentioned yet are Frankenstein and Wuthering Heights – both gothic novels celebrate anniversaries in 2018. Frankenstein was published in 1818 and Wuthering Heights’ author, Emily Bronte, was born in the same year. To tie in with these anniversaries we’re running a challenge in July that anyone from around the world can get involved in. All we’d like you to do is to make something creative (eg story, poetry, art, game, music, soundscape etc) inspired by the gothic novel genre and share it with us. You can find out more details on the Gothic Novel Jam page.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #classicread, you might like to tweet about it using #classicread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #classicread. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #classicread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.