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Join the #watchread discussion on #rwpchat during August

August 1, 2015

#watchread

This month’s theme is #watchread

” Children watching a puppet show, 28th & O Street playground” Adolph B. Rice Studio, August 11, 1958

Will you be watching films or television, or will you be watching the clock to make time for your favorite thing to read, watch or play? Have you been watching your to-read pile grow throughout the year? Social reading sites like Goodreads or Shelfari allow you to set up virtual shelves of what you have read, and what you plan to read. You can even set yourself a challenge to read a certain number of books in a year, and watch your progress.

Do you prefer to read, watch or play the original format first? Do you like watching television series live, or do you watch online or DVD catch up so you can choose how and when you watch?  Do you enjoy reality TV, or would you rather read a book that examines its impact on our lives?

Maybe you will be heading outside to try some bird watching, or some stargazing. August is the peak time to watch the Perseid Meteor Shower, particularly in the northern hemisphere.

Organisations like Amnesty International or ICAC watch out for opportunities to advocate for human rights or for the integrity of our public administrators, and groups like CHOICE or The Checkout advocate for consumer rights.

Perhaps you’d rather spend some time learning more about the history of watches and other time-keeping devices, or you might like to read a story about keeping time.

What will your favourite #watchread be this month? Don’ forget…while you are reading, playing or watching your #watchread, you might like to tweet about it using #watchread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #watchread.  You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #watchread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

There will be a twitter discussion on 25 August starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 9am – 11am and 2pm – 4pm BST, 12.00 noon Central European Time. Note: this is a staggered start to the discussion.

Use the tags #watchread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #watchread, so others can join in the conversation too.

 

catching up on the #chillread discussion for #rwpchat

July 29, 2015

If you missed the #chillread discussion, you missed some wonderful and chilling suggestions.  You can look at the storify of the tweets here.  Thanks to all the people who made some great suggestions for #chillread.

You can see some of the wide range of the discussion in these tweets below

 

 

Next month we will focus on #watchread

Join the #chillread discussion today on #rwpchat

July 28, 2015

There will be a twitter discussion, today, 28 July starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm; 6pm – 8pm BST.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags  #chillread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of  #chillread, so others can join in the conversation too.

Huskies pulling sledge

Huskies pulling sledge from State Library of NSW collection

Will you be shivering or chilling with Ice station by Matthew Reilly,  Ice Station Zebra by Alistair MacLean or Chasing the light by Jesse Blackadder?  You may also want to explore the history of the Antarctic with information about Roald Amundsen, Ernest Shackleton, Robert Scott and their expeditions.

Will you be reading books which make chills go up your spine, or watching or reading tales of crime that makes your blood run cold or is true crime more your style? Do you chill with Jo Nesbo, Henning Mankell, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir and Karin Alvtegen and their characters in cold climates? Or are you seeking to chill out and relax?  This could be a time to try reading some comics, or is reading about romance more your #chillread?

Perhaps ice-cream and gelato recipes will your #chillread, or will you be making cocktails, reading about craft beer, or even making it.

Hobbies can help us chill, so you may want to explore knitting, crochet, or cycling (or you could be knitting and crocheting while watching the Tour de France).  Will you be playing winter sports in the chill to keep warm, or summer sports to chill out?

Do games help you chill?  Does World of Warcraft help (with the chilly home world of the Dwarves and Gnomes), or do you chill with crossword or jigsaw puzzles, or would you rather scrabble or other board games?

What is music is a #chillread for you?  Or do you want the speakers to freeze so you have silence?

We also should include Frozen, The snow queen, and the Lion, the witch and the wardrobe.  If you want sadder reading try, The little match girl and the Happy prince (which are both #chillread titles), and of course, “Winter is coming”.  The Hobbit and The Lord of the rings are also #chillread titles to watch or read or play.

What will be your favourite #chillread this month? Don’t forget …while you are reading, playing or watching your #chillread, you might like to tweet about it using  #chillread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your  #technoread.  You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use  #chillread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

#chillread in other worlds #rwpchat

July 21, 2015

Recent releases of Seveneves and Nemesis games (although it is suggested that you read the rest of the series first) both highlight the #chillread elements in some science fiction. I don’t want to say too much, for fear of spoilers, but both of these novels have big changes happening to earth, and the different responses highlight two very different imagined futures.  Both of these novels demonstrate the power of #chillread and science fiction.

A rather lovely fantasy novel, The goblin emperor, is a powerful #chillread for different reasons.  There are political games, crimes which need solving, and characters growing in confidence, with many events occurring in the chill of winter.

None of these are books to chill to as they each have disturbing aspects to their stories, but they all have moments of joy and wonder as well as terror and sorrow.

You can always look at amazing images instead

Francis Joseph Glacier, 1906

Ellen Forsyth

catching up on the #legalread discussion for #rwpchat

July 3, 2015

Did you miss the #legalread discussion this week.  You can catch up on this interesting discussion on Storify.

 

 

July is #chillread.

Join the July #chillread discussion for #rwpchat

June 30, 2015

This month the theme is #chillread, as some people will be chilly and others will be chilling out.

Huskies pulling sledge

Huskies pulling sledge from State Library of NSW collection

Will you be shivering or chilling with Ice station by Matthew Reilly,  Ice Station Zebra by Alistair MacLean or Chasing the light by Jesse Blackadder?  You may also want to explore the history of the Antarctic with information about Roald Amundsen, Ernest Shackleton, Robert Scott and their expeditions.

Will you be reading books which make chills go up your spine, or watching or reading tales of crime that makes your blood run cold or is true crime more your style? Do you chill with Jo Nesbo, Henning Mankell, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir and Karin Alvtegen and their characters in cold climates? Or are you seeking to chill out and relax?  This could be a time to try reading some comics, or is reading about romance more your #chillread?

Perhaps ice-cream and gelato recipes will your #chillread, or will you be making cocktails, reading about craft beer, or even making it.

Hobbies can help us chill, so you may want to explore knitting, crochet, or cycling (or you could be knitting and crocheting while watching the Tour de France).  Will you be playing winter sports in the chill to keep warm, or summer sports to chill out?

Do games help you chill?  Does World of Warcraft help (with the chilly home world of the Dwarves and Gnomes), or do you chill with crossword or jigsaw puzzles, or would you rather scrabble or other board games?

What is music is a #chillread for you?  Or do you want the speakers to freeze so you have silence?

We also should include Frozen, The snow queen, and the Lion, the witch and the wardrobe.  If you want sadder reading try, The little match girl and the Happy prince (which are both #chillread titles), and of course, “Winter is coming”.  The Hobbit and The Lord of the rings are also #chillread titles to watch or read or play.

What will be your favourite #chillread this month? Don’t forget …while you are reading, playing or watching your #chillread, you might like to tweet about it using  #chillread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your  #technoread.  You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use  #chillread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

There will be a twitter discussion on 28 July starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am and 2pm – 4pm BST.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags  #chillread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of  #chillread, so others can join in the conversation too.

Join the #legalread discussion today #rwpchat

June 30, 2015

#legalread

There will be a twitter discussion on 30 June starting at 11am, and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 8.00am GMT, 12.00 noon Central European Time. Note: this is a staggered start to the discussion.

Use the tags #legalread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #legalread, so others can join in the conversation too.

Magna Carter Memorial

Magna Carter Memorial, photographed by Trevor Lowe

 

2015 marks the 800th anniversary of one of the world’s most important documents: Magna Carta.

Magna Carta is so much more than a peace treaty between a quarrelsome King and his barons, sealed (not signed) in a meadow on the banks of the Thames on June 19th, 1215. Its lasting iconic value as the foundation of so many world democracies lies in the power of an idea – a principle, which states that nobody, including the King, is above the law of the land.

You can find out more about Magna Carta through the anniversary committee’s website or on Twitter: #MagnaCarter800th

Some aspects of law have become entrenched in popular culture, such as the Miranda Warning, while every day, around the world, people seek legal information in plain language including Hot Topics online. Genealogists, students of history and those who are simply curious also regularly access sites such as Births, Deaths and Marriages, Convict Records, the Old Bailey Online, various Police Gazettes and pieces of legislation that changed our lives including Mabo.

The law has also played an increasingly important role in crime fiction from tales of Robin Hood and Sherlock Holmes, classic tales of those who feel forced to break the law – for examples some of the characters in the novels by Charles Dickens – to thrillers by Harlan Coben and modern day police procedurals including works by Ian Rankin and legal procedurals from authors including Sydney Bauer, John Grisham and Lisa Scottoline. Readers who enjoy these novels might also enjoy the forensic procedural, a genre dominated by the likes of Patricia Cornwell and Kathy Reichs. These stories easily translate to large and small screens with popular shows including Bones, Castle, Cold Case, New Tricks, Rake and many more. Other popular genres also provide opportunities to read about the law from James S. A. Corey to Star Trek.

For those who prefer fact to fiction there are numerous true crime works available (books and documentaries) as well as biographies of legal professionals and histories of famous legal battles.

The only judgements made for #legalread are those found online, on the page and on the screen: readers are free to play around with what interests them and perhaps use #legalread to engage with a type of fiction or non-fiction that they have not read or watched before (you can also play games).

 

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