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Join the #twistedread discussion this month for #rwpchat

October 1, 2017

#twistedread

TWISTED

This month we explore the realms of the alternative and the unusual, taking the winding road with #twistedread.

The exploration of twisted characters is a perennial favourite with classics like Robert Louis Stevenson’s “Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Me. Hyde”, Marcel Allain & Pierre Souvestre’s Fantômas series or Brett Easton Ellis’ “American Psycho” raising reader’s hair, as well as the endless supply of true crime stories, like “Helter Skelter: the true story of the Manson Murders” or “Sins of the Brother: the definitive story of Ivan Milat and the backpacker murders”, proving that fact is more twisted than fiction.

With the publishing boom in cookery books you can easily find a twist on a favourite recipe. Nigella Lawson, Heston Blumenthal & Donna Hay are just a couple of perennial cookery favourites that stand out from the crowd. Toffee & bread experimentation to get those crazy flavour mixes and knotted loaves is perfect for #twistedread! For the drinkers, you could add some flair to an old favourite with a title like “Tequila Mockingbird: cocktails with a literary twist” by Tim Federle or get your alchemist on with “Experimental Homebrewing: mad science in the pursuit of great beer” by Drew Beechum & Denny Conn.

Twisted kids reads abound with obvious favourites Paul Jenning’s “Round the Twist” series, the entertaining work’s of Roald Dahl (very popular with adults as well!) and the amazing fractured fairytales of “Grim Tales”, which featured the late, great Rik Mayall reading the Brothers Grimm’s classic works.

For fitness fans #twistedread could be about yoga or dancing, abseiling or boat sailing (anything with ropes…). Hairdressing to get those “100 Awesome Hair Days”. Relive your Souting/Girl Guides days relearning a sheet bend or a sheepshank with “The Complete Book of Knots & Ropework”. Horticulture & landscaping to create a meandering hedge or secret garden nook down a mysterious, winding garden path. Electronics with circuit bending to create crazy sounds. Take it to the streets with some break dancing or street poetry, rapping and tongue twisting lyricism!

In the area of the sciences there is a wide selection for #twistedread with stories of DNA like “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot, intense weather like Hurricane Katrina with “Nine Lives: death & life in New Orleans” by Dan Baum and the mind bending works of the great mathematicians with “God Created the Integers” by Stephen Hawking.

There will be a twitter discussion on 31 October starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time. 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 8am – 10.30am GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #twistedread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #twistedread, so others can join in the conversation too!

Join the #comfortread discussion today for #rwpchat

September 26, 2017

#comfortread

Reading is tiring

Reading is tiring, but books are comfortable by Jerzy Kociatkiewicz Flickr Commons

Join the Twitter discussion today 26 September, starting at 11.00am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time,   8am – 10.30am GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #comfortread this month, you might like to tweet about it using hashtags #comfortread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about it. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #comfortread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

The very act of reading is a comfort to book lovers, regardless of what is being read. Reading itself reduces stress quickly and reliably, but sometimes we need to go straight to our old favourites for ultimate comfort. Jane Eyre, of course, is a beloved happy place, whether in book or film/television form, and many classics act in the same way. Re-reading can be very comforting, for children and adults, so don’t be afraid to revisit childhood favourites. Perhaps an afternoon of childhood games would be just the ticket.

Nigella Lawson finds cooking itself comforting, and has many recipes for bolstering food. Jamie Oliver also understands the power of food to comfort. If cooking is more a chore than a hobby for you, you may like to knit a scarf, some socks or something from Star Wars.

In times of grief we have an especial need for comfort, and books about grief, such as those by C.S. Lewis and Joan Didion, can help. Books filled with beautiful photography can also soothe without the need for text, or you could go for feel good stories, films or games – mood boosting books, perhaps.

Be comfortable while you read with these gorgeous ideas for reading nooks, or you could read about making your home cosy with interior decorating. Binge watch Grand Designs, or borrow stacks of gardening/building/crafting books and videos to spur you on with your hobbies.

Don’t let anyone tell you what you ought to be reading; you know what you enjoy and you can read it guilt free! You could also try getting out of your comfort zone; read a genre you usually don’t like. Let your reading, watching and playing bring you comfort this month.

 

Hobbits are all about comfort

September 22, 2017

Today is Hobbit Day, the day we celebrate Bilbo and Frodo’s birthday, and all that we love about the Shire folk, and the one who created them. Tolkien’s beloved books are comfort reads for many, and hobbits, of course, are comfort-loving folk. Food, drink, more food, a crackling fire and a nap before a party with dancing and fireworks are how they would choose to fill their days, and who could argue with the wisdom in that?

Middle-earth would have been a very different place, if hobbits were the only folk to live there, but how the hobbits deal with the dramas of the elves, men, dwarves and wizards, shows us their great strength, loyalty and resilience – qualities we need in abundance through the uncertainties of our own world.

So, you might like to eat seven meals today, go barefoot, have a huge, outdoor party, or just curl up with a copy of The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings, and revel in #comfortreading at its best.

Happy Hobbit Day.

here are the 2018 themes for #rwpchat

September 4, 2017

For 2018 we are revisiting the most popular themes from recent years.  We hope you enjoy them.

January – #firstread

February – #wildread

March – #redread

April – #wellread

May – #localread

June – #technoread

July – #classicread

August – #urbanread

September–#reelread

October– #secretread

November- #crimeread

December – #chilloutread

Read

Image thanks to RJ

 

September is the perfect time for #comfortread for #rwpchat

September 1, 2017

#comfortread

Reading is tiring

Reading is tiring, but books are comfortable by Jerzy Kociatkiewicz Flickr Commons

The very act of reading is a comfort to book lovers, regardless of what is being read. Reading itself reduces stress quickly and reliably, but sometimes we need to go straight to our old favourites for ultimate comfort. Jane Eyre, of course, is a beloved happy place, whether in book or film/television form, and many classics act in the same way. Re-reading can be very comforting, for children and adults, so don’t be afraid to revisit childhood favourites. Perhaps an afternoon of childhood games would be just the ticket.

Nigella Lawson finds cooking itself comforting, and has many recipes for bolstering food. Jamie Oliver also understands the power of food to comfort. If cooking is more a chore than a hobby for you, you may like to knit a scarf, some socks or something from Star Wars.

In times of grief we have an especial need for comfort, and books about grief, such as those by C.S. Lewis and Joan Didion, can help. Books filled with beautiful photography can also soothe without the need for text, or you could go for feel good stories, films or games – mood boosting books, perhaps.

Be comfortable while you read with these gorgeous ideas for reading nooks, or you could read about making your home cosy with interior decorating. Binge watch Grand Designs, or borrow stacks of gardening/building/crafting books and videos to spur you on with your hobbies.

Don’t let anyone tell you what you ought to be reading; you know what you enjoy and you can read it guilt free! You could also try getting out of your comfort zone; read a genre you usually don’t like. Let your reading, watching and playing bring you comfort this month.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #comfortread this month, you might like to tweet about it using hashtags #comfortread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about it. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #comfortread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

 

join the #nightread discussion today for #rwpchat

August 29, 2017
Barn owl

Barn owl by oldbilluk (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

There will be a Twitter discussion today, Tuesday 29 August starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

What is your favourite #nightread this month? While you are reading, watching or playing your #nightread, you might like to tweet about it using the tags #nightread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you.

This month the theme is #nightread. Will you be looking at the night sky to see the stars? The Sky at Night by Patrick Moore will help you identify them. Skies in remote dark places are the best viewing spots. A blanket of stars surrounds you and reaches almost to the ground, a truly magical experience. Perhaps you use a telescope to enable you to see the stars in more detail. How about looking at: The universe through the eyes of Hubble by Oli Usher and Lars Lindberg Christensen – photographs taken by The Hubble Space Telescope.

Maybe you prefer to read fiction for your #nightread staying up all night to read more of an amazing novel that you are engrossed in: The Trap by Melanie Raabe. Just one more page or just to the end of this chapter then you will turn out the light and go to sleep. Before you know it’s the early hours of the morning and you have to be up for work soon.

Do you play music while reading your #nightread choice? Maybe some Nightwish, Welcome to my Nightmare by Alice Cooper or Night Prowler by AC/DC

Perhaps you read a bedtime story to your children before you tuck them up in bed. Are they afraid of the dark like Plop in The owl who was afraid of the dark by Jill Tomlinson or are they scared of the monster that lurks under the bed. Read Things That Go Bump in the Night: How to Help Children Resolve Their Natural Fears by Paul Warren for advice and don’t let the bed bugs bite.

Do you like to watch a scary film at night, something that’s going to make you check you locked the front door and closed all the windows.

Nocturnal creatures come out to play and hunt at night. Foxes scavenge in dustbins for leftovers and vampire bats come out of their caves to drink the blood of their unsuspecting victims. Owls silently swoop on their prey while the mice try to scurry out of harm’s way. Read Creatures of the night by Camilla de la Bédoyère. In your garden hedgehogs snuffle along the ground for food and badgers hide in their labyrinthine underground setts. Badgerlands : the twilight world of Britain’s most enigmatic animal by Patrick Barkham will tell you more about them. In your home hamsters run in their wheels in the middle of the night and wake you up and the cat flap rattles as your cat goes out on its nightly prowl.

Then there are other creatures of the night that might appear during the witching hour: demons, and ghosts and witches. A discovery of witches by Deborah Harkness is an atmospheric #nightread

 

Join us for #nightread this month #rwpchat

August 1, 2017
Barn owl

Barn owl by oldbilluk (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

This month the theme is #nightread.  Will you be looking at the night sky to see the stars?  The Sky at Night by Patrick Moore will help you identify them.  Skies in remote dark places are the best viewing spots.  A blanket of stars surrounds you and reaches almost to the ground, a truly magical experience.  Perhaps you use a telescope to enable you to see the stars in more detail.  How about looking at: The universe through the eyes of Hubble by Oli Usher and Lars Lindberg Christensen – photographs taken by The Hubble Space Telescope.

Maybe you prefer to read fiction for your #nightread staying up all night to read more of an amazing novel that you are engrossed in: The Trap by Melanie Raabe.  Just one more page or just to the end of this chapter then you will turn out the light and go to sleep. Before you know it’s the early hours of the morning and you have to be up for work soon.

Do you play music while reading your #nightread choice? Maybe some Nightwish, Welcome to my Nightmare by Alice Cooper or Night Prowler by AC/DC

Perhaps you read a bedtime story to your children before you tuck them up in bed.  Are they afraid of the dark like Plop in The owl who was afraid of the dark by Jill Tomlinson or are they scared of the monster that lurks under the bed.  Read Things That Go Bump in the Night: How to Help Children Resolve Their Natural Fears by Paul Warren for advice and don’t let the bed bugs bite.

Do you like to watch a scary film at night, something that’s going to make you check you locked the front door and closed all the windows.

Nocturnal creatures come out to play and hunt at night.  Foxes scavenge in dustbins for leftovers and vampire bats come out of their caves to drink the blood of their unsuspecting victims. Owls silently swoop on their prey while the mice try to scurry out of harm’s way.  Read Creatures of the night by Camilla de la Bédoyère. In your garden hedgehogs snuffle along the ground for food and badgers hide in their labyrinthine underground setts.  Badgerlands : the twilight world of Britain’s most enigmatic animal by Patrick Barkham will tell you more about them.  In your home hamsters run in their wheels in the middle of the night and wake you up and the cat flap rattles as your cat goes out on its nightly prowl.

Then there are other creatures of the night that might appear during the witching hour: demons, and ghosts and witches.  A discovery of witches by Deborah Harkness is an atmospheric #nightread

What will be your favourite #nightread this month?  While you are reading, watching or playing your #nightread, you might like to tweet about it using the tags #nightread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you.

There will be a Twitter discussion on Tuesday 29 August starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST.  Note this is a staggered discussion.