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Join the #artread discussion today for #rwpchat

July 26, 2016

The Twitter discussion takes place, today, 26 July, starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time. 9.00pm New Zealand Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 8am – 10.30am, 2pm – 4pm GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

This month the theme is #artread. Artists who are they & what do they do all day?

Try a biography John Piper, Myfanwy Piper : lives in art linking art, theatre and music. I, Leonardo : Ralph Steadman one artist portraying the life of another. The artist revealed by his studio 7 Reece Mews : Francis Bacon’s studio.

Reflect by Sue Apple

Reflect by Sue Apple

Who would you choose to paint your portrait? A S Byatt choose Patrick Heron but Lady Churchill hated Graham Sutherland’s portrait of Sir Winston.

Catalogues of art collections A way of life : Jim Ede at Kettle’s Yard. A home and gallery featuring many works by Alfred Wallis who epitomises the St Ives artists . You could collect art antiques yourself.

Artists real or fake? In Nat Tate : an American artist, 1928-1960 libraries had trouble deciding which. The artist’s character as subject for fiction The portrait: Iain Pears, Permanent violet: Ronald Frame, Sheer blue bliss: Lesley Glaister , Notes from an exhibition: Patrick Gale, The bird artist: Howard A Norman.

You may have visited places steeped in art, Charleston : a Bloomsbury house and garden or read of places becoming art after 100 years Still life : inside the Antarctic huts of Scott and Shackleton. Modern Architects became as famous as their buildings : Norman Foster or Le Corbusier.

Its interior design can have an impact on how we view a building too, just as graphic design has an impact on how we view other objects as well.

Art escapes into the wild, Andy Goldsworthy : a collaboration with nature, Anthony Gormley’s figures in the landscape. From Bodies in the landscape move to Body art, as in Tattoos. Or bodies shaped into art in ballet and modern dance. Other performing arts take to the stage in theatre or the cinema screen, including art house films.

Art from the wild, found objects, the artist recycling an object into art. Be inspired by Derek Jarman’s garden .

In the landscape photographer James Ravillious :an English eye is the son of artist Eric Ravillious. Different generation, medium, all art.

In the film Blow Up a fashion photographer thinks he has filmed a murder. In the 1960s photographers David Bailey & Norman Parkinson were famous enough to be know just by their surnames.

Taxidermy has had a modern revival but knitted taxidermy may have more practitioners. See fashion as art – Zandra Rhodes : textile revolution . Cornelia Parker’s collaborative Magna Carta embroidery.

Books as art objects – have a look on Pinterest for book covers as art and book spines as poetry. Make your own poems and appreciate your existing books in a new way. Buy an old book and make it into art by illustrating and rearranging the text – one artist spent 40 years working on one book. Artist’s books are the ultimate in hand crafted texts.

Art therapy and creating all types of art are great for your well being. Some libraries run book folding sessions with their unsalable stock as an aid to mindfulness.

You could learn how to make art with conventional techniques and materials. Become a painter, sculptor or photographer.

Graphic artists like Alan Fletcher: Beware wet paint and turn fonts into art. Graphic novelists like Frank Quietly create in a comic or graphic format. Others reboot existing fiction for a new younger audience. Banksy brought graffiti from wall to gallery.

Illustrations convey the narrative in Shackleton’s journey: William GrillKate Greenaway award winner 2015. Children’s books illustrations can be a revelation. Other Art prizes include the Turner Prize often keeping art in the news with controversy and the Archibald.

Art and crime meet in the theft from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and in Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code book and film. Author Patricia Cornwall may have cut a piece from a Sickert painting in Portrait of a killer : Jack the Ripper– case closed. Ancient art and archaeology feature in the Jack West Jr novels of Matthew Reilly.

What is ART? Let’s try and find out in #artread.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #artread this month, you might like to tweet about it using hashtags #artread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about it. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #artread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

 

knitting and other fibre arts for #artread

July 20, 2016

Knitting (and many other recreational activities) can be #artread.  Tom of Holland, highlights the #artread aspects of mending as through repair favourite items can be renewed. #visiblemending is another term to explore. Some of the results of this very visible mending are lovely. There are many wonderful blogs to read about knitting, including the work of Kate Davies, and Karie Westerman.

You can explore hyperbolic crochet, combining maths and making, by looking at the crochet coral reef.  Knitting or crocheting neurons may be more your thing, and you can explore it here.  These are lovely combinations of science and #artread.
Demokratiet har plads til os alleWhen knitting, crocheting or mending, there are options of listening to podcasts.  In our time can be an excellent inspiration for #artread.

I am avoiding the art/craft discussion as this is sometimes in the eye of the beholder.  You might want to explore ideas of craftivism as part of #artread.  If you are seeking community for knitting or crochet, consider joining Ravelry.

What do you enjoy making for #artread?  Please share photographs and include the tags #artread and #rwpchat.

Galleries and #artread

July 6, 2016
Image credit: Hartford Connecticut ~ Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art ~ Gallery (Onasill ~ Bill Badzo CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Image credit: Hartford Connecticut ~ Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art ~ Gallery (Onasill ~ Bill Badzo CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

This month’s theme is #artread.  I have always enjoyed visiting art galleries and can stand absorbed in front of a favourite painting for ages.  The Lady of Shalott by Pre-Raphaelite artist John William Waterhouse which is exhibited at Tate Britain in London is one of my favourites – I have a poster of it hanging on my wall at home.  I like the vibrant colours which stand out in stark contrast in the gloaming.

I also like the landscapes and night-scenes of cities depicted by Atkinson Grimshaw.  They are so vivid you feel you could step into the canvas and be in the scene which is portrayed.  I saw many of his paintings at the Painter of Moonlight exhibition at the Guildhall Art Gallery in London.  A favourite of mine is Silver Moonlight, the play of moonlight through the trees is magical.

Monet’s Water-Lily Pond is another favourite of mine and was included in Monet: The Water Garden at Giverny exhibition at the National Gallery in London.  I have also visited his garden at Giverny and seen the famous pond that Monet depicted in many paintings.  I could imagine him stood at his easel painting in the sunshine.

I also like the art nouveau work of Czech artist Alphonse Mucha and enjoyed seeing his advertisements, postcards, illustrations, paintings and designs at the Mucha Museum in Prague.  I particularly like the advertising poster he designed for Monaco – Monte Carlo, P.L.M. railway services and have a print of it in my kitchen.

I also like modern art and enjoyed seeing Joan Miró: The Ladder of Escape exhibition at the Tate Modern.  On a visit to Barcelona I went to The Fundació Joan Miró which contains many of his sculptures drawings and works of art.

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York is one of the largest in the world.  I spent several hours wandering through the different galleries looking at sculpture, photography, prints, drawings, paintings, architecture and design.

Join us @ReadWatchPlay on Tuesday 26 July when we will be discussing #artread.  Use the tags #artread and #rwpchat so everyone can join in the conversation.

Monique, Surrey Libraries

July is a lovely time for #artread as part of #rwpchat

July 1, 2016

#artread

This month the theme is #artread. Artists who are they & what do they do all day?

Try a biography John Piper, Myfanwy Piper : lives in art linking art, theatre and music. I, Leonardo : Ralph Steadman one artist portraying the life of another. The artist revealed by his studio 7 Reece Mews : Francis Bacon’s studio.

Reflect by Sue Apple

Reflect by Sue Apple

Who would you choose to paint your portrait? A S Byatt choose Patrick Heron but Lady Churchill hated Graham Sutherland’s portrait of Sir Winston.

Catalogues of art collections A way of life : Jim Ede at Kettle’s Yard. A home and gallery featuring many works by Alfred Wallis who epitomises the St Ives artists . You could collect art antiques yourself.

Artists real or fake? In Nat Tate : an American artist, 1928-1960 libraries had trouble deciding which. The artist’s character as subject for fiction The portrait: Iain Pears, Permanent violet: Ronald Frame, Sheer blue bliss: Lesley Glaister , Notes from an exhibition: Patrick Gale, The bird artist: Howard A Norman.

You may have visited places steeped in art, Charleston : a Bloomsbury house and garden or read of places becoming art after 100 years Still life : inside the Antarctic huts of Scott and Shackleton. Modern Architects became as famous as their buildings : Norman Foster or Le Corbusier.

Its interior design can have an impact on how we view a building too, just as graphic design has an impact on how we view other objects as well.

Art escapes into the wild, Andy Goldsworthy : a collaboration with nature, Anthony Gormley’s figures in the landscape. From Bodies in the landscape move to Body art, as in Tattoos. Or bodies shaped into art in ballet and modern dance. Other performing arts take to the stage in theatre or the cinema screen, including art house films.

Art from the wild, found objects, the artist recycling an object into art. Be inspired by Derek Jarman’s garden .

In the landscape photographer James Ravillious :an English eye is the son of artist Eric Ravillious. Different generation, medium, all art.

In the film Blow Up a fashion photographer thinks he has filmed a murder. In the 1960s photographers David Bailey & Norman Parkinson were famous enough to be know just by their surnames.

Taxidermy has had a modern revival but knitted taxidermy may have more practitioners. See fashion as art – Zandra Rhodes : textile revolution . Cornelia Parker’s collaborative Magna Carta embroidery.

Books as art objects – have a look on Pinterest for book covers as art and book spines as poetry. Make your own poems and appreciate your existing books in a new way. Buy an old book and make it into art by illustrating and rearranging the text – one artist spent 40 years working on one book. Artist’s books are the ultimate in hand crafted texts.

Art therapy and creating all types of art are great for your well being. Some libraries run book folding sessions with their unsalable stock as an aid to mindfulness.

You could learn how to make art with conventional techniques and materials. Become a painter, sculptor or photographer.

Graphic artists like Alan Fletcher: Beware wet paint and turn fonts into art. Graphic novelists like Frank Quietly create in a comic or graphic format. Others reboot existing fiction for a new younger audience. Banksy brought graffiti from wall to gallery.

Illustrations convey the narrative in Shackleton’s journey: William GrillKate Greenaway award winner 2015. Children’s books illustrations can be a revelation. Other Art prizes include the Turner Prize often keeping art in the news with controversy and the Archibald.

Art and crime meet in the theft from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and in Dan Brown’s Da Vinci Code book and film. Author Patricia Cornwall may have cut a piece from a Sickert painting in Portrait of a killer : Jack the Ripper– case closed. Ancient art and archaeology feature in the Jack West Jr novels of Matthew Reilly.

What is ART? Let’s try and find out in #artread.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #artread this month, you might like to tweet about it using hashtags #artread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about it. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #artread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

The Twitter discussion takes place on 26 July, starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time. 9.00pm New Zealand Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 8am – 10.30am, 2pm – 4pm GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

 

join the #bookclubread discussion today for #rwpchat

June 28, 2016

There will be a #bookclubread Twitter discussion, today, June 28 starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Time, 8am – 10.30am, 2pm – 4pm, 6pm – 8pm GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Whether you are loorosieprojectking for a serious discussion or an excuse to regularly catch up with friends, a book club is a wonderful way to share the joy of reading. You will probably be reading books you would never have chosen yourself, this can lead you to some truly wonderful experiences, but it can also prove quite a challenge!

Books like Still Alice by Lisa Genova, The Help by Kathryn Stockett and The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls almost certainly owe their success to book clubs. More recently, The Paris Wife by Paula McLain, The Husband’s Secret by Liane Moriarty and All the Light we Cannot See by Anthony Doerr have been popular choices for discussion.

There is no guaranteed formula for book club success, but historical fiction, themes of triumph over adversity and stories that are uplifting or inspiring are in high demand. Consider how much time your book club has to read – A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry and The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt are wonderful books for discussion, but at 800+ pages each, they might be daunting for many readers.

Traditional book clubs have involved a group of adults reading and discussing the same book, but we are now seeing groups especially for children, young adults or for parents & children. Groups may choose to read around a specific theme or genre, or in a certain language. Groups are also exploring different formats like film, article and audio book discussions.

Modern book clubs may not meet up in person at all, many book discussions take place online on Tumblr, Goodreads and Twitter or on television programs like ABC’s The Book Club.

Book Clubs are such a big part of life that we often see them in pop culture like Channel 4’s series The Book Group, or the page to screen success The Jane Austen Book Club.

It can be hard to join a book group; they are such fun that spaces don’t come up that often. Don’t be shy to start your own, get a couple of friends to invite a couple of friends and have a first meeting to talk about what you’d like to do – you have the advantage of being able to make it up as you go along.

Your local public library can be a wonderful source of resources for book clubs. Many have meeting rooms that can be booked for a small cost or event for free, some libraries have open book discussion groups that are open to all members of the community and it is becoming common for libraries to collect sets of books especially for book clubs to borrow. Ask your local library to see what they have on offer – at the very least they will be able to suggest some great discussable reads!

There are a number of websites dedicated to supporting book groups. They are a great source of ideas and readers’ guides and include LitLovers , Reading Group Choices and Reading Group Guides.

If you are looking for some more book club resources, try the NSW Readers’ Advisory Services Wiki, and let us know your favourite book club reads in the comments.

These are just a few #bookclubread ideas and suggestions and you may have different ideas about the theme – we would really like to hear about them. Don’t forget that while you are reading, playing or watching your #bookclubread, you can tweet about it using #bookclubread #rwpchat, so that other people can have a conversation with you about it. You can also add to the discussion on Pinterest, or post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #bookclubread #rwpchat so that others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

suggestions to explore for #bookclubread #rwchat

June 13, 2016

The publisher Tor Books encourages different ways of exploring reading and watching. On their blog, they have a series of reading and watching groups. The Harry Potter reread, which has taken a couple of years, has just finished. This has included reading two chapters a week (with a few short breaks), and watching the relevant film (after each book is completed). Other rereads to explore include the Words of radiance, Temeraire, Vorkosigan Saga, and you can watch Star Trek, the original series. The discussions take place via the comments. This is an interesting and leisurely way to participate in a reading group.

 

Ellen Forsyth

Reader recommendations #bookclubread

June 9, 2016
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Image by Mace Ojala (CC BY-SA 2.0)

This month’s theme is #bookclubread.  I must confess I don’t actually belong to a book club myself (No! I don’t want to join a book club by Virginia Ironside comes to mind) which is why Read, Watch, Play is perfect for me.  I can share ideas about books I have read and get recommendations from like-minded people from the other side of the world without having to meetup.  Saying that, when I meet my friends we always talk about books, discussing the finer details of plot and whether we guessed whodunit.  We read a lot of thrillers, particularly Scandi noir.

 

A colleague of mine does belong to a book club and says some people’s choices can be a bit of a challenge to read as they are not something she would have picked herself.  Which I suppose is one reason to belong to a book club – to be taken out of your comfort zone and maybe read a genre of book you would never normally touch with a bargepole.

I have read books proposed by the Richard and Judy Book Club:  The versions of us by Laura Barnett – the ultimate what if book which has three possible outcomes.  I let you go by Clare Mackintosh, a brilliant psychological thriller and Girl on the train by Paula Hawkins which was a gripping read.

Working in a library I am always asked for, and given recommendations by my readers.  One of my readers, a lady of ninety, wants to read what I’m reading.  Another reader urged me to read Disclaimer by Renee Knight saying it was one of the best books she had ever read.  I also suggest books to reading groups who come in looking for a recommendation for their next book.  In the UK it is National Reading Group Day on 18 June which is a great opportunity to celebrate belonging to a reading group, to join a group or to set up your own.

Join us @ReadWatchPlay on Tuesday 28 June when we will be discussing #bookclubread.  Use the tags #bookclubread and #rwpchat so everyone can join in the conversation.

Monique (Surrey Libraries)

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