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Harry Potter Night

February 4, 2016
HPBN-logo

Reading Harry Potter (again) is like coming home. After a period of adventurous reading outside your comfort zone, a trip to your happy place can be just what you need. Bloomsbury understands the power of Harry to unite, excite and inspire readers, and bring to us the second ever Harry Potter Book Night, tonight! Celebrating all things Harry Potter, Harry Potter Book Night is for those of us who have lost count of how many times we have read the books, and for those just beginning their journey in the Potterverse. You can see what events are planned across the world using this map.

This year is a special year for fans, with the new film, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and play, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, and every year is a good year to read the original books. The heft of the later books might make you think they don’t qualify as a #speedread, but the characters are so endearing and the plot so exciting, you can’t help but race through them.

If you are joining in, share your celebrations using the hashtag #HarryPotterBookNight and don’t forget to join in the #speedread Twitter conversation on the 23rd of February, using the hashtag #rwpchat.

February is time for #speedread for #rwpchat

February 1, 2016

#speedread

This month the theme is #speedread. Will you be racing through your way through your #speedread choices, or taking things at a more leisurely pace?

Delta II rocket - ICESat and CHIPSat

Delta II rocket – ICESat and CHIPSat – NASA on the Commons

How quickly do you want to get through a gripping page-turner, keen to find out what happens next? Are there books you’ve not been able to put down until you finished reading them? Or do you prefer to take your time and savour the words? Maybe it’s an easier read… a Mills and Boon that you whizz through, or a fast-paced western. Does Dr Who time-travelling faster than the speed of light grab your attention?

Exam preparation sometimes has to be a speedy affair – identifying and pulling out the relevant information from resources and textbooks as quickly and efficiently as possible before the exams.

Do you prefer your books to be short, or even shorter than that? Is your attention best kept by short stories? Some writers can be very quick reads indeed, even if those books aren’t particularly short – the writer’s style just makes it easy to sprint through.

Athletics and sports often emphasise the importance of speed. You could be a fan of racers and racing in a particular sport. Are fast cars, boats, or sports such as luge or downhill skiing your favourite sports? Speed is often behind world record attempts – the fastest person, animal, vehicle – and the need to break those records is a driving force for some people. Take a look at The World’s Fastest Indian and Donald Campbell’s Bluebird. Time taken to travel overland and in the air was shortened by services such as bullet trains and Concorde, the commercial airliner that broke the sound barrier.

Do you love getting out on your motorbike at weekends? Sons of Anarchy are fond of the biker lifestyle too, but the TV series portrays a darker side of motorcycle clubs.

The pace of plot development in some books can make them a #speedread. Action and thriller books and films, often carry the reader along at a fast pace through the twists and turns in the plot. For example try James Bond, Jason Bourne books and films, and the books of Matthew Reilly.

Are you a fan of fast classical music, such as the Minute Waltz or Flight of the Bumble Bee, or is modern electronic dance something that gets your blood pumping?

Speed is also slang for amphetamines. Find out the impact this drug had on Lemmy from rock band Motorhead in his autobiography White line fever. However, you might be more interested in a professional pharmacological opinion of them instead.

Find out how to get things done quickly. It could be fast cleaning and saving time on housework, 15 minute meals, speed dating. While we’re on the subject of dating, what about taking the time to show how much you care about your libraries on Library Lovers Day (14th February)? Maybe you prefer to slow it down instead and take your time. Do you prefer slow cooking, relaxing walks rather than running, taking time to get to know someone? Your pace of life might be something you want to change, so it might be time for a sea change/tree change.

A fast paced life often calls for quick thinking. Some of the quick thinking techniques in Malcolm Gladwell’s Blink could be what you need.

If you’re looking for easy and quick reads for children you could try out these recommendations for those in middle school, or these graphic novels for children.

What will be your favourite #speedread this month? Don’t forget …while you are reading, playing or watching your #speedread, you might like to tweet about it using hashtags #speedread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #speedread. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #speedread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

There will be a Twitter discussion on 23Feb starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am and 2pm – 4pm BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #speedread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #speedread, so others can join in the conversation too.

Gary Green (Surrey Libraries)

catch up with the #wildread discussion for #rwpchat

January 27, 2016

This month the reading discussion theme is #wildread. This triggered wide ranging tweets about what different people think is a #wildread which also included films, television, music and games. You can read the Storify of the discussion here.

 

provide examples of some of the discussion. Firefly, Star Wars, The walking dead and the Brontes all featured too.

Next month the discussion will focus on #speedread.

today is #libraryshelfie day #rwpchat

January 27, 2016

Today is #libraryshelfie day.
#libraryshelfie day was started by New York Public Library, and many other people and libraries have participated.  To participate, photograph shelves in a library.  There are lots of ways to do this.  You may be in the photograph, or you may photograph shelves.  It can be a favourite library you like to visit (or work in), or your shelves at home.

Please share the photograph on social media with #libraryshelfie – it would be great if you could include #rwpchat, and if it is a #libraryshelfie for #wildread include that tag as well.

join the #wildread discussion for #rwpchat, today

January 26, 2016

There will be a twitter discussion today, 26 January starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm; 6pm – 8pm BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #wildread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #wildread, so others can join in the conversation too.

Where the Wild Things Aren't. James Alby

Where the Wild Things Aren’t. James Alby

The #wildread theme brings to mind lots of great books about being wild, such the children’s classics ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ by Maurice Sendak and ‘Call of the Wild’ by Jack London, which could lead to some great themed photographs in the library. Here are some free printable finger puppets of Max and his crew that borrowers old or young could be asked ‘model’ as a way of introducing them to the #RWP game. We would like to engage the public as much as possible in our RWP game this year, therefore any suggestions towards this would be very welcomed!

Other #wildread related books that could be incorporated into a post or a book display are the popular books about having an adventure in the wilderness. Two fairly recent books that were made into movies are ‘Wild : From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail” by Cheryl Strayed and “Into the Wild” by Jon Krakauer. Ideas that revolve around this trope could include non-fiction survival guides, camping books, and travel adventure stories. As many people go away camping at this time of year, this would be a good time to naturally link to this part of the collection as a display topic.

#wildreads is also something that lends itself very naturally to sci-fi and fantasy fiction, and there are so many books with fantastic worlds that can be highlighted with this theme. These include the popular junior, youth and adult genres of books about shapeshifters, vampires and other creatures that go bump in the night, as well as fairy tale books, which are enjoying a resurgence. And Doctor Who, of course, who really does play by his own rules as he jaunts about saving the universe.

Lonesome Dove, the book and the miniseries will take you to the wild west, and you could shake things up by adding some sci-fi to your western with Firefly and Serenity.

Perhaps the most famous Wilde of all time is, of course, Oscar Wilde, and the #wildread month could lend itself to sharing some of his more memorable quotes, which range from the profound:

“The spirit of an age may be best expressed in the abstract ideal arts, for the spirit itself is abstract and ideal..”

to the absurd:

“Arguments are to be avoided: they are always vulgar and often convincing.”

It could be that the January #rwpchat might revolve around a series of your favourite quotes by this master wordsmith.

Getting wild with your watching could mean an awful lot of David Attenborough or Bear Grylls, exploring uncharted territories, bush tucker and world heritage areas, but it could just mean stepping out of your comfort zone and watching something different.

Surely, a game of Jumanji is a must this month…..

 

 

An African #wildread

January 13, 2016

3780747688_eabba77b95_z

(c) Arno Meintjes / Flickr [CC BY-NC-SA 2.0]

This month’s theme is #wildread.  The ultimate wild adventure is going on safari in Africa and seeing the big five in the wild.  Getting up at dawn to self-drive in Kruger National Park is amazing.  The thrill of discovering the animals yourself: coming across two giraffes pulling acacia leaves from a tree, waiting while a herd of wildebeest crosses the road in front of you and then following them to a watering hole.

Or if you’re brave enough how about walking with lions which is a unique and memorable  experience.  Accompanying lions in their natural habitat on foot for an hour and half was unforgettable. Or feeding animals: giving a bottle of milk to an orphaned elephant at an elephant sanctuary; letting a giraffe eat out of your hand – their long grey tongue feels like sandpaper.  Or  how about feeding an ostrich and then watching them run a race.

Seen Meerkat Manor?  How about seeing them in the wild which is absolutely magical.   Standing silently in line while waiting for it to be warm enough for them to emerge from their burrows.  Which they did, slowly one by one, each meerkat looking down the line at each of us.  When they had established that we were no threat to them we had the privilege of accompanying them as they foraged for food.

Or how about taking an early morning balloon trip over Sossusvlei in Namibia.  Watching the play of light on the sand dunes while flying over them was incredible.  Seeing an aerial view of the landscape and animals, mainly oryx was breathtaking.

Then there is the wild African weather – unpredictable and dramatic.   A sudden windstorm whipping up, as we were finishing our braai, blowing dust into our eyes.  Having to shelter under a bridge across the road, from hailstones the size of golf balls, while driving in Swaziland.

Why not share your ultimate wild experience during our live Twitter chat on Tuesday 26 January using the #wildread hashtag.

Monique Robertson (Surrey Libraries)

start 2016 with #wildread for #rwpchat

January 1, 2016
Where the Wild Things Aren't. James Alby

Where the Wild Things Aren’t. James Alby

It can sometimes be a bit hard to get inspired about being back at work after the Festive Season, so we are beginning our year of Read Watch & Play with the fun theme of #wildread.

The #wildread theme brings to mind lots of great books about being wild, such the children’s classics ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ by Maurice Sendak and ‘Call of the Wild’ by Jack London, which could lead to some great themed photographs in the library. Here are some free printable finger puppets of Max and his crew that borrowers old or young could be asked ‘model’ as a way of introducing them to the #RWP game. We would like to engage the public as much as possible in our RWP game this year, therefore any suggestions towards this would be very welcomed!

Other #wildread related books that could be incorporated into a post or a book display are the popular books about having an adventure in the wilderness. Two fairly recent books that were made into movies are ‘Wild : From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail” by Cheryl Strayed and “Into the Wild” by Jon Krakauer. Ideas that revolve around this trope could include non-fiction survival guides, camping books, and travel adventure stories. As many people go away camping at this time of year, this would be a good time to naturally link to this part of the collection as a display topic.

#wildreads is also something that lends itself very naturally to sci-fi and fantasy fiction, and there are so many books with fantastic worlds that can be highlighted with this theme. These include the popular junior, youth and adult genres of books about shapeshifters, vampires and other creatures that go bump in the night, as well as fairy tale books, which are enjoying a resurgence. And Doctor Who, of course, who really does play by his own rules as he jaunts about saving the universe.

Lonesome Dove, the book and the miniseries will take you to the wild west, and you could shake things up by adding some sci-fi to your western with Firefly and Serenity.

Perhaps the most famous Wilde of all time is, of course, Oscar Wilde, and the #wildread month could lend itself to sharing some of his more memorable quotes, which range from the profound:

“The spirit of an age may be best expressed in the abstract ideal arts, for the spirit itself is abstract and ideal..”

to the absurd:

“Arguments are to be avoided: they are always vulgar and often convincing.”

It could be that the January #rwpchat might revolve around a series of your favourite quotes by this master wordsmith.

Getting wild with your watching could mean an awful lot of David Attenborough or Bear Grylls, exploring uncharted territories, bush tucker and world heritage areas, but it could just mean stepping out of your comfort zone and watching something different.

Surely, a game of Jumanji is a must this month…..

There will be a twitter discussion on 26 January starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm; 6pm – 8pm BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #wildread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #wildread, so others can join in the conversation too.

 

 

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