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How will you participate in World read aloud day? #wrad2017 #rwpchat

February 16, 2017

Today is World read aloud day. Who will you be reading to today? Will you be making it a #diverseread?

World read aloud day - image courtesy of LitWorld

World read aloud day – image courtesy of LitWorld

share some #librarylove for #rwpchat and #diverseread

February 14, 2017

Today, as well as being Valentine’s Day, is Library lovers’ day. It can be a day to show how much you love your local library.

There are many ways you can show your #librarylove. You could try a blind date with a book…

Blind Date with Book 2013

or combine #librarylove with #diverseread and join the Book Riot reader harder challenge #ReadHarder

  1. Read a book about sports.
  2. Read a debut novel.
  3. Read a book about books.
  4. Read a book set in Central or South America, written by a Central or South American author.
  5. Read a book by an immigrant or with a central immigration narrative.
  6. Read an all-ages comic.
  7. Read a book published between 1900 and 1950.
  8. Read a travel memoir.
  9. Read a book you’ve read before.
  10. Read a book that is set within 100 miles of your location.
  11. Read a book that is set more than 5000 miles from your location.
  12. Read a fantasy novel.
  13. Read a nonfiction book about technology.
  14. Read a book about war.
  15. Read a YA or middle grade novel by an author who identifies as LGBTQ+.
  16. Read a book that has been banned or frequently challenged in your country.
  17. Read a classic by an author of color.
  18. Read a superhero comic with a female lead.
  19. Read a book in which a character of color goes on a spiritual journey (From Daniel José Older, author of Salsa Nocturna, the Bone Street Rumba urban fantasy series, and YA novel Shadowshaper)
  20. Read an LGBTQ+ romance novel (From Sarah MacLean, author of ten bestselling historical romance novels)
  21. Read a book published by a micropress. (From Roxane Gay, bestselling author of Ayiti, An Untamed State, Bad Feminist, Marvel’s World of Wakanda, and the forthcoming Hunger and Difficult Women)
  22. Read a collection of stories by a woman. (From Celeste Ng, author Everything I Never Told You and the forthcoming Little Fires Everywhere)
  23. Read a collection of poetry in translation on a theme other than love. (From Ausma Zehanat Khan, author of the Esa Khattak/Rachel Getty mystery series, including The Unquiet Dead, The Language of Secrets, and the forthcoming Among the Ruins)
  24. Read a book wherein all point-of-view characters are people of color. (From Jacqueline Koyanagi, author of sci-fi novel Ascension)

and borrow some of these from your favourite library. #librarylove does not have to be romantic.

Reading different genres for #diverseread

February 2, 2017
istock_000081274829_medium

Diverse people reading (Photo credit Istock 501338658 4×6)

This month’s theme is #diverseread.  I enjoy reading books about different cultures and diverse topics and ideas.  I have recently finished reading The Shaman in Stilettos by Anna Hunt which is about her experiences in Peru training to be a shaman and is a subject I knew nothing about.

I enjoyed the dystopian Hunger Games trilogy by Suzanne Collins, and the subsequent films, as they were completely different to what I had read before.  I also read children’s books and particularly like the White Giraffe series by Lauren St John as they are well written exciting stories.

I like reading books that have been translated from another language and then watching the sub-titled foreign language series as they give you an insight into different people and cultures.  One of my favourites are the thrillers by Swedish author Camilla Läckberg.  I also enjoy seeing the characters come to life on the screen in the accompanying television series.

Before I visit a country I like to read literature which is set there.  Before travelling to Japan I read some of Haruki Murakami’s novels, my favourite being Kafka on the Shore.  Likewise preceding a trip to Alaska I read A cold day for murder, the first book in the Kate Shugak series, by Dana Stabenow who is an Alaskan crime writer.

At the moment I am reading the fourth book in the Mortal Instruments series – City of fallen angels by Cassandra Clare which is about the fantasy world of Downworlders, demons, Shadowhunters, vampires and werewolves.

You could say I have fairly diverse tastes in books and will not be put off trying something different, even if it is a genre I have never read before.

Monique (Surrey Libraries)

join us for #diverseread for February for #rwpchat

February 1, 2017

#diverseread

“Make up a story… For our sake and yours forget your name in the street; tell us what the world has been to you in the dark places and in the light. Don’t tell us what to believe, what to fear. Show us belief’s wide skirt and the stitch that unravels fear’s caul.”

Toni Morrison, The Nobel Lecture In Literature, 1993

“Doctor Who: You want weapons? We’re in a library. Books are the best weapon in the world. This room’s the greatest arsenal we could have. Arm yourself!

(from Tooth and Claw in Season 2)”

Russell T. Davies

This month, arm yourself with diverse reading.

How diverse is your reading?  Are you reading about people who are different to you? Are you watching films and documentaries about diverse subjects and ideas.

We need diverse books because we are all different and more diverse reading can help us see our communities and environments differently.  It can make us more understanding of others.

This month is #diverseread, but we hope that for every other theme this year you will be making them a #diverseread as it makes all reading more interesting.  It is also a great idea for watching and playing too.

When did you last read:

  • a horror book
  • a nonfiction book about science
  • a collection of essays
  • a book out loud to someone else
  • a children’s book
  • poetry
  • a dystopian or post-apocalyptic novel
  • a book originally published in the decade you were born
  • listen to an audiobook
  • a book over 500 pages long
  • a book under 100 pages  
  • a book by or about a person that identifies as transgender
  • a book that is set in the Middle East  
  • a book that is by an author from Southeast Asia
  • a book of historical fiction set before 1900
  • the first book in a series by a person of colour
  • a non-superhero comic that debuted in the last three years
  • a book that was adapted into a movie, then watch the movie
  • a book which has been translated from another language (and preferably written in the last ten years)
  • a nonfiction book about feminism or dealing with feminist themes
  • a book with a main character that has a mental illness
  • a book with a character with a disability
  • a book by an Indigenous person
  • a book by someone from your town?

Thanks to Bookriot for their list which was used as the basis for the above one.

For fiction, do the characters you read about reflect the diversity of what is possible and the diversity of who is in the world as well as who is in your community? For non-fiction are you sure you are getting the whole story?

There are some wonderful young adult books to read…
2005 Powwow

In the USA there has been a lot of coverage about the need for diverse books, all readers need diverse books, and diverse watching and playing.

There is much to explore in fantasy, …and if you are still not sure what to tryGoodreads presents a brilliant range of diverse reading too.

There will be a Twitter discussion on 28 February starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #diverseread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #diverseread, so others can join in the conversation too.

Join the #firstread discussion today #rwpchat

January 31, 2017

#firstread

firstread

Felix’s first book by Sarah Horrigan Flickr Commons

There will be a twitter discussion today, 31 January  starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time.  6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm; 6pm – 8pm BST (UK).  Note this is a staggered discussion.

Please use the tags  #firstread and #rwpchat as you discuss your reading, watching, and playing that is your experience of  #firstread, so that others can join in the conversation too.

There is nothing like the experience of falling in love with a book; it can’t be repeated. You can read the book over and over, loving it more each time, but you can only read it for the first time once. Thankfully, there is no end to books, films and games to discover for the first time, and many other ways to start off the Read Watch Play year with #firstread.

What was the first book you remember loving? The first book you read in a  beloved genre? The games we first played always have a special place in our hearts, and the music that was popular in our teenage years cannot be beaten. 

Our own lives are full of firsts we can celebrate, and so are those of others. Explore  scientific firsts, space travel firsts, exploration and adventure firsts. The first time someone murdered, fell in love or got a job.

 Have you read the first book your favourite author has written, the first album released by a favourite artist? How do the firsts compare with the most recent? Though not the first novel written by Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre was the first published, so we can definitely start our year off with the best.

Debut novels can be hard to follow up, but you could read your way through this list of second novels, or just pick the first from a huge number of top tens.

Whatever you choose to read, watch or play this month, it’s all going to be your first for this year so definitely fits the #firstread theme.

 

#OdysseyJam is happening as part of #WaterRead in March

January 18, 2017
horseserpent-tweakTo tie in with #WaterRead in March we are also doing something a bit different – an online interactive story writing challenge with a watery theme, specifically Homer’s The Odyssey – an ancient tale of Odysseus’ journey home across the seas after the Trojan War, with a mix of fantastical mythical creatures, gods and mortals. The challenge will be hosted on the itch.io game site and will run from 11th – 27th March 2017 and it is open for anyone at all in the world to submit an entry… whether you’ve written interactive fiction before or not. All types of text based games are welcome, including interactive fiction and visual novels. Even though the focus is on creating a written interactive story, it can include other media too – images, sound, video etc. If you’re looking for visual inspiration we’ve sourced hundreds of ancient Greek images from the British Library, which you can use freely in your entry if you want to. If you do use them, be sure to give the British Library a mention in the credits of your game.

The Odyssey was epic, but your entry into #OdysseyJam doesn’t have to be a long piece of work. It also doesn’t have to cover the whole of the Odyssey – you could create something that focuses on a small part of the story, and you don’t even have to set it in ancient Greece, just use The Odyssey for inspiration. For example, this French/Japanese cartoon Ulysses 31 took the original Odyssey story off into space. Why not take this epic tale somewhere new?

You can also work as part of a team, or it can be a solo effort.

Want to join in but never made a text based game before?

Why not try using some of this free software – all of which are focused on creating interactive fiction and text adventures.

As Homer said in the Odyssey “There is a time for many words, and there is also a time for sleep.” … and now’s the time for writing many words for #OdysseyJam.

If you post anything on social media please use hashtag #OdysseyJam.

Start 2017 with #firstread for #rwpchat

January 1, 2017

#firstread

firstread

Felix’s first book by Sarah Horrigan Flickr Commons

There is nothing like the experience of falling in love with a book; it can’t be repeated. You can read the book over and over, loving it more each time, but you can only read it for the first time once. Thankfully, there is no end to books, films and games to discover for the first time, and many other ways to start off the Read Watch Play year with #firstread.

What was the first book you remember loving? The first book you read in a  beloved genre? The games we first played always have a special place in our hearts, and the music that was popular in our teenage years cannot be beaten. 

Our own lives are full of firsts we can celebrate, and so are those of others. Explore  scientific firsts, space travel firsts, exploration and adventure firsts. The first time someone murdered, fell in love or got a job.

 Have you read the first book your favourite author has written, the first album released by a favourite artist? How do the firsts compare with the most recent? Though not the first novel written by Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre was the first published, so we can definitely start our year off with the best.

Debut novels can be hard to follow up, but you could read your way through this list of second novels, or just pick the first from a huge number of top tens.

Whatever you choose to read, watch or play this month, it’s all going to be your first for this year so definitely fits the #firstread theme.

There will be a twitter discussion on January 31 starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time.  6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm GMT (UK).  Note this is a staggered discussion.

Please use the tags  #firstread and #rwpchat as you discuss your reading, watching, and playing that is your experience of  #firstread, so that others can join in the conversation too.