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Join the #comfortread discussion today for #rwpchat

September 26, 2017

#comfortread

Reading is tiring

Reading is tiring, but books are comfortable by Jerzy Kociatkiewicz Flickr Commons

Join the Twitter discussion today 26 September, starting at 11.00am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time,   8am – 10.30am GMT. Note this is a staggered discussion.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #comfortread this month, you might like to tweet about it using hashtags #comfortread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about it. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #comfortread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

The very act of reading is a comfort to book lovers, regardless of what is being read. Reading itself reduces stress quickly and reliably, but sometimes we need to go straight to our old favourites for ultimate comfort. Jane Eyre, of course, is a beloved happy place, whether in book or film/television form, and many classics act in the same way. Re-reading can be very comforting, for children and adults, so don’t be afraid to revisit childhood favourites. Perhaps an afternoon of childhood games would be just the ticket.

Nigella Lawson finds cooking itself comforting, and has many recipes for bolstering food. Jamie Oliver also understands the power of food to comfort. If cooking is more a chore than a hobby for you, you may like to knit a scarf, some socks or something from Star Wars.

In times of grief we have an especial need for comfort, and books about grief, such as those by C.S. Lewis and Joan Didion, can help. Books filled with beautiful photography can also soothe without the need for text, or you could go for feel good stories, films or games – mood boosting books, perhaps.

Be comfortable while you read with these gorgeous ideas for reading nooks, or you could read about making your home cosy with interior decorating. Binge watch Grand Designs, or borrow stacks of gardening/building/crafting books and videos to spur you on with your hobbies.

Don’t let anyone tell you what you ought to be reading; you know what you enjoy and you can read it guilt free! You could also try getting out of your comfort zone; read a genre you usually don’t like. Let your reading, watching and playing bring you comfort this month.

 

Hobbits are all about comfort

September 22, 2017

Today is Hobbit Day, the day we celebrate Bilbo and Frodo’s birthday, and all that we love about the Shire folk, and the one who created them. Tolkien’s beloved books are comfort reads for many, and hobbits, of course, are comfort-loving folk. Food, drink, more food, a crackling fire and a nap before a party with dancing and fireworks are how they would choose to fill their days, and who could argue with the wisdom in that?

Middle-earth would have been a very different place, if hobbits were the only folk to live there, but how the hobbits deal with the dramas of the elves, men, dwarves and wizards, shows us their great strength, loyalty and resilience – qualities we need in abundance through the uncertainties of our own world.

So, you might like to eat seven meals today, go barefoot, have a huge, outdoor party, or just curl up with a copy of The Hobbit or The Lord of the Rings, and revel in #comfortreading at its best.

Happy Hobbit Day.

here are the 2018 themes for #rwpchat

September 4, 2017

For 2018 we are revisiting the most popular themes from recent years.  We hope you enjoy them.

January – #firstread

February – #wildread

March – #redread

April – #wellread

May – #localread

June – #technoread

July – #classicread

August – #urbanread

September–#reelread

October– #secretread

November- #crimeread

December – #chilloutread

Read

Image thanks to RJ

 

September is the perfect time for #comfortread for #rwpchat

September 1, 2017

#comfortread

Reading is tiring

Reading is tiring, but books are comfortable by Jerzy Kociatkiewicz Flickr Commons

The very act of reading is a comfort to book lovers, regardless of what is being read. Reading itself reduces stress quickly and reliably, but sometimes we need to go straight to our old favourites for ultimate comfort. Jane Eyre, of course, is a beloved happy place, whether in book or film/television form, and many classics act in the same way. Re-reading can be very comforting, for children and adults, so don’t be afraid to revisit childhood favourites. Perhaps an afternoon of childhood games would be just the ticket.

Nigella Lawson finds cooking itself comforting, and has many recipes for bolstering food. Jamie Oliver also understands the power of food to comfort. If cooking is more a chore than a hobby for you, you may like to knit a scarf, some socks or something from Star Wars.

In times of grief we have an especial need for comfort, and books about grief, such as those by C.S. Lewis and Joan Didion, can help. Books filled with beautiful photography can also soothe without the need for text, or you could go for feel good stories, films or games – mood boosting books, perhaps.

Be comfortable while you read with these gorgeous ideas for reading nooks, or you could read about making your home cosy with interior decorating. Binge watch Grand Designs, or borrow stacks of gardening/building/crafting books and videos to spur you on with your hobbies.

Don’t let anyone tell you what you ought to be reading; you know what you enjoy and you can read it guilt free! You could also try getting out of your comfort zone; read a genre you usually don’t like. Let your reading, watching and playing bring you comfort this month.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #comfortread this month, you might like to tweet about it using hashtags #comfortread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about it. You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #comfortread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

 

join the #nightread discussion today for #rwpchat

August 29, 2017
Barn owl

Barn owl by oldbilluk (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

There will be a Twitter discussion today, Tuesday 29 August starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

What is your favourite #nightread this month? While you are reading, watching or playing your #nightread, you might like to tweet about it using the tags #nightread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you.

This month the theme is #nightread. Will you be looking at the night sky to see the stars? The Sky at Night by Patrick Moore will help you identify them. Skies in remote dark places are the best viewing spots. A blanket of stars surrounds you and reaches almost to the ground, a truly magical experience. Perhaps you use a telescope to enable you to see the stars in more detail. How about looking at: The universe through the eyes of Hubble by Oli Usher and Lars Lindberg Christensen – photographs taken by The Hubble Space Telescope.

Maybe you prefer to read fiction for your #nightread staying up all night to read more of an amazing novel that you are engrossed in: The Trap by Melanie Raabe. Just one more page or just to the end of this chapter then you will turn out the light and go to sleep. Before you know it’s the early hours of the morning and you have to be up for work soon.

Do you play music while reading your #nightread choice? Maybe some Nightwish, Welcome to my Nightmare by Alice Cooper or Night Prowler by AC/DC

Perhaps you read a bedtime story to your children before you tuck them up in bed. Are they afraid of the dark like Plop in The owl who was afraid of the dark by Jill Tomlinson or are they scared of the monster that lurks under the bed. Read Things That Go Bump in the Night: How to Help Children Resolve Their Natural Fears by Paul Warren for advice and don’t let the bed bugs bite.

Do you like to watch a scary film at night, something that’s going to make you check you locked the front door and closed all the windows.

Nocturnal creatures come out to play and hunt at night. Foxes scavenge in dustbins for leftovers and vampire bats come out of their caves to drink the blood of their unsuspecting victims. Owls silently swoop on their prey while the mice try to scurry out of harm’s way. Read Creatures of the night by Camilla de la Bédoyère. In your garden hedgehogs snuffle along the ground for food and badgers hide in their labyrinthine underground setts. Badgerlands : the twilight world of Britain’s most enigmatic animal by Patrick Barkham will tell you more about them. In your home hamsters run in their wheels in the middle of the night and wake you up and the cat flap rattles as your cat goes out on its nightly prowl.

Then there are other creatures of the night that might appear during the witching hour: demons, and ghosts and witches. A discovery of witches by Deborah Harkness is an atmospheric #nightread

 

Join us for #nightread this month #rwpchat

August 1, 2017
Barn owl

Barn owl by oldbilluk (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

This month the theme is #nightread.  Will you be looking at the night sky to see the stars?  The Sky at Night by Patrick Moore will help you identify them.  Skies in remote dark places are the best viewing spots.  A blanket of stars surrounds you and reaches almost to the ground, a truly magical experience.  Perhaps you use a telescope to enable you to see the stars in more detail.  How about looking at: The universe through the eyes of Hubble by Oli Usher and Lars Lindberg Christensen – photographs taken by The Hubble Space Telescope.

Maybe you prefer to read fiction for your #nightread staying up all night to read more of an amazing novel that you are engrossed in: The Trap by Melanie Raabe.  Just one more page or just to the end of this chapter then you will turn out the light and go to sleep. Before you know it’s the early hours of the morning and you have to be up for work soon.

Do you play music while reading your #nightread choice? Maybe some Nightwish, Welcome to my Nightmare by Alice Cooper or Night Prowler by AC/DC

Perhaps you read a bedtime story to your children before you tuck them up in bed.  Are they afraid of the dark like Plop in The owl who was afraid of the dark by Jill Tomlinson or are they scared of the monster that lurks under the bed.  Read Things That Go Bump in the Night: How to Help Children Resolve Their Natural Fears by Paul Warren for advice and don’t let the bed bugs bite.

Do you like to watch a scary film at night, something that’s going to make you check you locked the front door and closed all the windows.

Nocturnal creatures come out to play and hunt at night.  Foxes scavenge in dustbins for leftovers and vampire bats come out of their caves to drink the blood of their unsuspecting victims. Owls silently swoop on their prey while the mice try to scurry out of harm’s way.  Read Creatures of the night by Camilla de la Bédoyère. In your garden hedgehogs snuffle along the ground for food and badgers hide in their labyrinthine underground setts.  Badgerlands : the twilight world of Britain’s most enigmatic animal by Patrick Barkham will tell you more about them.  In your home hamsters run in their wheels in the middle of the night and wake you up and the cat flap rattles as your cat goes out on its nightly prowl.

Then there are other creatures of the night that might appear during the witching hour: demons, and ghosts and witches.  A discovery of witches by Deborah Harkness is an atmospheric #nightread

What will be your favourite #nightread this month?  While you are reading, watching or playing your #nightread, you might like to tweet about it using the tags #nightread and #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you.

There will be a Twitter discussion on Tuesday 29 August starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

in the #humouread discussion today for #rwpchat

July 25, 2017

#humourread

A Reader, a Watcher and a Player walk into a bar. . .

There will be a twitter discussion today, 25 July starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time. 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #humourread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #humourread, so others can join in the conversation too

July is all about humour. Interestingly, for all the vigorous debate around what is and what is not “classic” reading; what is and what is not funny can generate even more disagreement. A sense of humour can be shared but what makes us laugh is also deeply personal.

Humour comes in many different styles from the understated to the slapstick, from playful to satire, from black humour to celebratory humour. Reading, watching and playing humorous material can make us feel uncomfortable, make us smile or laugh out loud, or even make us forget about the world around us (for a little while at least).

Laughing

Laughing by Chi Wai Un

What will make you laugh in July?

There are joke books and riddle books. There are lots of cartoon books such as Footrot Flats and Garfield.

There are lots of books that can make us laugh including works by Douglas Adams, Jasper Fforde, Terry Pratchett, William Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde and PG Wodehouse. There are also works that offer more serious humour including Stella Gibbons and Evelyn Waugh. At the other end of the humour scale there are books about bottoms from authors Terry Denton, Andy Griffiths, Paul Jennings and Jenny Mawter.

There is a vast array of material to watch in July ranging from Grumpy Cats to over a million memes as well as timeless British film and television with Monty Python, Blackadder, Fawlty Towers and To the Manor Born being a very small sample of the titles available.

There are also funny people we can watch: Wil Anderson, Tiny Fey, Amy Poehler (and we can read some of their auto-biographies and biographies too). There are also funny things that happen to us: embarrassing incidents, travel tales and the occasional workplace disaster. We can, too, play at being humorous with games like charades and Pictionary in addition to the odd practical joke.

So, this July, crack a smile or crack up. Laugh (or see if you can make someone else laugh). Share a joke and share your #humourread, watch or play.

There will be a twitter discussion on 25 July starting at 11am and 8.00pm Australian Eastern Daylight Savings (Summer) Time. 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm; 6pm – 8pm BST. Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #humourread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of #humourread, so others can join in the conversation too