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The theme for November for #rwpchat is #funread

November 1, 2014

Huisvrouw met schoonmaakattributen / A housewife surrounded by cleaning utensils #funread

Join the discussion this month about #funread.  We will be focusing on all things fun in this discussion.

Suggesting a #funread to someone else is one of the toughest things to do.  Each of us finds fun in different ways.  We all laugh at different things.

Fun and funny are not universal.  With the suggestions for how you might explore #funread, some will appeal and others will have you wondering how anyone can think that could possibly be fun.  We don’t want someone’s fun to cause someone else harm.

If you read comics, think about the ones which are the most fun.  If you don’t read comics, try one.  Do you do cosplay for fun?

Some #funread areas can have cringe or groan qualities.  Chick lit (for example Anita Heiss, Jennifer Crusie, Helen Fielding) and ladlit (with authors like Nick Hornby, Ben Elton and Matt Dunn) can bring those qualities out, in a gentle way.

Anh Do, Miranda Hart, Stephen Fry, Dawn French, Caitlin Moran, Jennifer Saunders, Joanna Lumley, all are self deprecating, amusing, but all with a story to tell.

What are your favourite comedy films?  Do you like slapstick, or do you prefer your fun to be darker or more subtle? Do you love Cath and Kim? Hamish and Andy? The Goons, Red Dwarf, anything by John Cleese?

Parodies like Sense and sensibility and sea monsters will be divisive.  As can satire like Gullivers travels.  Does The Eyre affair excite or worry you?

Cheesy jokes (some of these may be nsfw) have a wonderful cringe quality while making us laugh (at least some of the time) while other times we will be groaning instead. Do your children love joke books?  The fart -ionary by Andy Jones has many followers. Do the jokes get better with age or just pass through the generations?

Shaun the sheep is a great watch and play for #funread http://www.shaunthesheep.com/ as are Wallace and Gromit http://www.wallaceandgromit.com/ with gentle humour.

Are there crime (Hamish McBeth, Janet Evanovich), romance (Anne Gracie), fantasy (Steampunk laughed all through Gail Carriger Soulless etc) and science fiction titles (Redshirts by John Scalzi) which are #funread?  Are there other genres which are #funread for you?  Do you like spoof horror?  Can a #funread also be a painful read?  Or does your #funread have dark edge to the humour and fun?

The whole point of holidays should be that they are fun.  Do you enjoy planning and researching holidays?  Do you plan in detail, or do you discover as you go along?  Do you like someone else to do all the planning for you?  Is a #funread thinking about where you might go on holiday – even if you never get there?  Do you have things which are special #funread for while you are on holidays?

Games are a great area to explore for fun.  They can be fun because of who you play with, of what happens in the game, or the story – and this is just for starters.  What games do you play for #funread? Which games make you laugh out loud when you play them? Which games do you keep coming back to?

What hobbies do you enjoy?  Are you a cook, a woodworker, do you belong to a singing group, do you cycle, do you weed national parks, paint, sculpt, recycle and reuse?  How do you find out more about your hobbies?  Why do you enjoy your hobbies?

While you are reading, playing or watching your #funread, you might like to tweet about it using #funread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #funread.  You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #funread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

There will be a twitter discussion on 25 November starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Summer Time.   9.00pm New Zealand  Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Time, 9am – 11am, 2pm – 4pm, 6pm – 8pm GMT.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #funread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of funread, so others can join in the conversation too.

Find out what was discussed on Tuesday for the #secretread discussion for #rwpchat

October 31, 2014

The secret read discussion is not a secret.  Have a look at it here on Storify.  Crime secrets, health secrets, and much more were discussed.

Join us for the #secretread discussion for #rwpchat – taking place today

October 28, 2014
via The Commons on flickr from the Mennonite Church USA Archives

via The Commons on flickr from the Mennonite Church USA Archives

#secretread

Join the discussion this month about #secretread.   Do you have a secret read too share?

Join the twitter discussion today, 28 October starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Summer Time.   9.00pm New Zealand  Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm; 6pm – 8pm GMT.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

Secrets can be hard to keep, and sometimes it s good to share a secret with others, like those of your secret reads- those books no-one knows you are reading! Do you have secret reads? Share them with others, as there should be no shame or embarrassment  in whatever anyone chooses to read. Its all reading- but if you do want to keep your reading secret,  there’s always audio-books and e-readers!

This is the month to read about secret societies, secret codes, secrets revealed and secret identities, there are many secret reads to uncover…

 Do you remember reading Nancy Drew, the Hardy boys and Enid Blyton’s Secret Seven series- with the secret societies solving mysteries and revealing secrets. These are just a few of the classic children’s series that introduce us to secret reads.  Harry Potter and his friends had lots of secrets too.

We all know mild mannered reporter Clark Kent has a super secret. Revisit Superman and your other  favourite superheroes in graphic novels and film as they continue to save the world while successfully concealing their  identities. Here are ten superheroes and their secret identities by  talented illustrator Coran “Kizer” Stone.

Feeling rebellious? Read some banned books- Books that have been challenged and banned for all sorts of reasons including to protect children, due to religious, racial or political content or because of what are deemed to be inappropriate themes. Don’t you want to read these books simply to find out what all the fuss is about? Its no secret that Goodreads has Banned Books lists available, to help you uncover some new reads.

This is the month to read a crime novel. Always full of secrets waiting to be unearthed, even the true identity of secret writers revealed, as in the case of The cuckoo’s calling by Robert Galbraith.

You may enjoy the challenge of unravelling the secrets hidden within a story. It may be a mystery, with clues,  perhaps a  red herring or two-read some Agatha Christie,  Margery Allingham, or for a contemporary, chilling , suspenseful story full of secrets, try Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.

Don’t forget  about  skeletons in the closet – read about family history, where you may find some well kept secrets.  Read some fiction about families (they always have secrets),  these books will keep you turning the pages, in an agony of suspense, waiting to discover whether the secrets to be revealed cause delight, heartache, or both. Try  something from the Goodreads list of Popular Family Secrets books.

Then there are the stories featuring spies, codes and ciphers. Try astute detective Sherlock Holmes, who uses logical reasoning to solve mysteries, Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, Mr Penumbra’s 24 hour bookstore, Dan Brown’s The lost symbol, Agent 21: Codebreaker by Chris Ryan and Six Sacred Stones by Matthew Reilly.

Sometimes you find yourself reading a book where the secrets hidden  within the pages of a book are revealed unexpectedly. These storylines are best kept secret- revealing spoilers may ruin these for someone else. Please don’t read any reviews before reading  Never let me go by Kazuo Ishiguro!

Discover the secret lives of celebrities, get to know the real person hidden behind the public persona, find out their secrets to success, even just “get the dirt” in an unauthorised biography.

Protect yourself from online identity theft, scams and find out about cyber safety at Cybersmart.

Read some true crime, about frauds and con people, in magazines newspapers and books, online and in print.

Explore a secret world! Once Britian’s best kept secret, Bletchley Park- home of the Code Breakers,  is open to visitors.

Find out the secret to success- this  was revealed in the self help book,  “The secret” by Rhonda Byrne- a best seller in 2006.

Finally, what about Wikileaks? Read online secret information, news leaks, and classified media published  from anonymous sources.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #secretread, you might like to tweet about it using #secretread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #secretread.  You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #secretread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

Use the tags #secretread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of secretread, so others can join in the conversation too.

#secretread – Espionage and spies

October 8, 2014

Emigma – Robert Harris –  Code breaking to win a war – the highest of stakes.  The real life staff of Bletchley Park keep their secret work a secret for decades.   Later a personal secret & maybe the Secret Service’s fear that he would disclose the Enigma secret led to the dead of Alan Turing.

Enigma - photograph taken by Sue Applegate

Enigma

Espionage and spies

In a post war macho world James Bond is the classic Secret agent – slaying SMERSH, triumphing over megalomaniacs  despite the vast number of women  falling at his feet.  Long after Ian Fleming’s death, other authors keep the Bond character alive.

Single Spies – Alan Bennett –  two plays which take a sideways looks at the lives of 2 Cambridge Spies after their spying was over.   The short comings of the Comrades in dentistry and tailoring contrast with the surveyor of the queen’s pictures’ discussing fakes.

The real world out did fiction – who knew what was true, who the 4th & 5th man were, as – Peter Wright’s Spy Catcher is outlawed.  The Cambridge Spies have fascinated novelists and biographers ever since.

The Profumo Affair was a big secret in 1963.  An English affair : sex, class and power in the age of Profumo  – national secrets at risk due to private secrets?

John Le Carre – the Circus ring master of tradecraft, Moles and lamplighters in a Cold War

George Smiley – the old Spy who unravels the the trail of the Mole in Tinker tailor soldier spy

The man from Uncle – a Russian and an American work together to battle the forces of THRUSH a series whose pedigree included ideas from Ian Fleming and  a nod to Sherlock Holmes.

For kids Secret Squirrel – was the master of 1960s spying gadgetry

Books are full of secrets: almost every novel – from the lightest romance to the Book Prize nominee contains a secret. Your #secretread task is to find that secret along with the main character.

The secret lover – William Trevor – Love and summer

The secret that society makes you hide – John Irving – In one person

The family secret – Secrets and Lies – Mike Leigh

A secret that affect later generations – Barbara Vine – the Blood doctor

Concealing a secret has a comic fallout – Tom Sharpe – Wilt

Donna Tartt explored a group who share a secret – in Secret History  and a single person’s secret in The Goldfinch.

Last word to the Crime and thrillers. The killer has one BIG secret. The suspects are just like the rest of us, but find their personal secrets uncovered from St Mary Mead to Nordic Noir

Sue Applegate – Surrey Library Service @SurreyLibraries

Find out what was discussed on Tuesday for the #classicread discussion for #rwpchat

October 2, 2014

If you missed our discussion on Tuesday you can catch up with the tweets about #classicread on Storify.  It included horror, crime, romance, Harry Potter, graphic novels, the Lego movie and much more.

Follow Read Watch Play’s board #classicread on Pinterest.

the #rwpchat theme for October is #secretread

October 1, 2014
via The Commons on flickr from the Mennonite Church USA Archives

via The Commons on flickr from the Mennonite Church USA Archives

#secretread

Join the discussion this month about #secretread.  We will be focusing on all things secret in this discussion (and it will be great to see what ideas people include).  You will have to share some secrets. Do you have a secret read too share?

Secrets can be hard to keep, and sometimes it s good to share a secret with others, like those of your secret reads- those books no-one knows you are reading! Do you have secret reads? Share them with others, as there should be no shame or embarrassment  in whatever anyone chooses to read. Its all reading- but if you do want to keep your reading secret,  there’s always audio-books and e-readers!

This is the month to read about secret societies, secret codes, secrets revealed and secret identities, there are many secret reads to uncover…

 Do you remember reading Nancy Drew, the Hardy boys and Enid Blyton’s Secret Seven series- with the secret societies solving mysteries and revealing secrets. These are just a few of the classic children’s series that introduce us to secret reads.  Harry Potter and his friends had lots of secrets too.

We all know mild mannered reporter Clark Kent has a super secret. Revisit Superman and your other  favourite superheroes in graphic novels and film as they continue to save the world while successfully concealing their  identities. Here are ten superheroes and their secret identities by  talented illustrator Coran “Kizer” Stone.

Feeling rebellious? Read some banned books- Books that have been challenged and banned for all sorts of reasons including to protect children, due to religious, racial or political content or because of what are deemed to be inappropriate themes. Don’t you want to read these books simply to find out what all the fuss is about? Its no secret that Goodreads has Banned Books lists available, to help you uncover some new reads.

This is the month to read a crime novel. Always full of secrets waiting to be unearthed, even the true identity of secret writers revealed, as in the case of The cuckoo’s calling by Robert Galbraith.

You may enjoy the challenge of unravelling the secrets hidden within a story. It may be a mystery, with clues,  perhaps a  red herring or two-read some Agatha Christie,  Margery Allingham, or for a contemporary, chilling , suspenseful story full of secrets, try Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.

Don’t forget  about  skeletons in the closet – read about family history, where you may find some well kept secrets.  Read some fiction about families (they always have secrets),  these books will keep you turning the pages, in an agony of suspense, waiting to discover whether the secrets to be revealed cause delight, heartache, or both. Try  something from the Goodreads list of Popular Family Secrets books.

Then there are the stories featuring spies, codes and ciphers. Try astute detective Sherlock Holmes, who uses logical reasoning to solve mysteries, Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, Mr Penumbra’s 24 hour bookstore, Dan Brown’s The lost symbol, Agent 21: Codebreaker by Chris Ryan and Six Sacred Stones by Matthew Reilly.

Sometimes you find yourself reading a book where the secrets hidden  within the pages of a book are revealed unexpectedly. These storylines are best kept secret- revealing spoilers may ruin these for someone else. Please don’t read any reviews before reading  Never let me go by Kazuo Ishiguro!

Discover the secret lives of celebrities, get to know the real person hidden behind the public persona, find out their secrets to success, even just “get the dirt” in an unauthorised biography.

Protect yourself from online identity theft, scams and find out about cyber safety at Cybersmart.

Read some true crime, about frauds and con people, in magazines newspapers and books, online and in print.

Explore a secret world! Once Britian’s best kept secret, Bletchley Park- home of the Code Breakers,  is open to visitors.

Find out the secret to success- this  was revealed in the self help book,  “The secret” by Rhonda Byrne- a best seller in 2006.

Finally, what about Wikileaks? Read online secret information, news leaks, and classified media published  from anonymous sources.

While you are reading, playing or watching your #secretread, you might like to tweet about it using #secretread #rwpchat so that other people can have a conversation with you about your #secretread.  You can add to the discussion on Pinterest too. You might like to post your photographs to Instagram or Flickr and use #secretread #rwpchat so others can share in your reading, watching and playing.

There will be a twitter discussion on 28 October starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Summer Time.   9.00pm New Zealand  Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm; 6pm – 8pm GMT.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

Use the tags #secretread and #rwpchat as you discuss the reading, watching playing that is your experience of secretread, so others can join in the conversation too.

join the #classicread discussion on twitter today #rwpchat

September 30, 2014

#classicread

Vintage Cars - Flikr Creative Commons http://www.flickr.com/photos/macieklew/

A classic for me is not necessarily a classic for you, so we’ll have a great discussion about the nature of a classic. What makes a modern classic? Is the Harry Potter series a classic because it has been so widely read, or are there other criteria  that are more important? What modern books would you call classics?

There will be a twitter discussion, today, on 30 September starting at 8.00pm Australian Eastern Standard Time.   9.00pm New Zealand  Time, 6.00pm Singapore Standard Time, 12.00 noon Central European Summer Time, 9am – 11am; 2pm – 4pm; 6pm – 8pm BST.  Note this is a staggered discussion.

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